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I found this interesting. but only reading is not enough you also need to grab ideas from what you read. this may help you, and by clicking on these and reading these article means you are trying to read. So your journey begin from here with hopefully good starting points.


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Just don't read them. Or, imagine what's next if you just let it go. Is it really that bad? Well, since you've posted a question here, I guess it is. So get deeper into why is it important for you to read programming books, or what will you miss if you don't. Two more helpful things to think about is to have some kind of a motivational kick before drifting ...


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I partly switched to podcasts. I listen them in the train, while running, ... And when I hear an interesting thing I'm searching the internet. Normally the texts there are shorter and not that timeconsuming. It's not like reading a good book, but it's better than nothing.


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There is an webapp called Pomotasker that can work on desktop and mobile browsers. Also it can store your task on the cloud, so that you can start your pomodoro on desktop and continue on mobile. Or you can use it as I do: add tasks on mobile before you forget and you'll have your task list ready when you get to your desk. Currently on beta but I'haven't ...


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I'll try to contribute by throwing some ideas around. I think reading (or better said, learning) is a way of life, which one I do not fully master all of the time, but at least seem to be quite comfortable with some of the time. I hope it helps you. First, ask yourself why you are reading programming books in the first place. If you want to become a better ...


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There are only a couple of programming books I've read cover to cover: Code Complete and The Pragmatic Programmer. Any other programming book I've read has been with the purpose to extract enough information to get a job done. It's a question of utility. Reading a short story is usually a different matter. You're drawn into the world the author created. ...


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I have been using Excel sheet for that (it's easy to maintain and swift to work with), with column A as description of repetitive tasks column B named as Period - weekly/monthly/quarter/yearly and column D as weekdays, E as date, F as Quarter no. etc. use short-cuts shift+L for Auto-filter it comes in handy. You can also have a column of priority or ...


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Well, I manage them with Microsoft Notepad. (Actually, vi.) It's worked smoothly for a decade. If you insist on something fancier, googling for "to do list" recurring finds half a dozen. (Which half dozen depends on which month you do that search...)


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From experience, opening a new programming book is always exciting. I start reading (even the dedication, acknowledgements etc.), but gradually loose the vibe and get tired. Here are a few concepts that help me carry on: Divide and Conquer - in programming (and GTD), D&C is dividing a complex task into simpler ones that can be more easily tackled. Plan ...



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