Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

15

Take breaks. Study for an hour and then a break, then another hour, etc. Never continue studying when you are no longer comprehending the material. Sleep. You will perform better on exams if you sleep well before the exam.


13

Try to make your promises more realistic. Saying you will NEVER waste time isn't going to happen. Instead give yourself a time budget for fun things. Like you will limit yourself to one movie a week. You will limit your internet time to X per day. Etc. You can also come up with a way to reward yourself. For example, you can watch a movie after you ...


12

While I don't have day+ breaks when reading, I do have them when writing/blogging/coding/etc. I find something that helps is to leave myself some context as to what was going on. I think this could help you with reading. You don't need a summary of each chapter; you need a way to get back in quickly. I'm thinking when you feel you are about to take a ...


12

If you are already doing 15 h a day of work, I’d agree that you shouldn’t be doing more, and like the other responders, would add that you might benefit from less, if you can make it more effective. Find a way to track the results of your study habits. I usually just do this mentally. As I do any work that is rated or graded, I think about how I prepared, ...


11

As someone who has had problems with mood, motivation and goal-setting almost all of his life... and as someone who is similarly introverted and into the idea of self-made-success... I've learned that the single most important factor in keeping the momentum to achieve life goals is: A regular routine of a healthy diet and (near-)daily exercise This may ...


9

It is generally agreed that while 70+ hour weeks can be productive in the short term they actually rapidly lead to a dramatic drop off in productivity, such that you would be better off dropping back down to 45 hours or thereabouts. I know long hours can be enjoyable and some cultures push you hard like this, but are you focusing on time rather than output ...


8

I recommend making a visual map of the key concepts in the text while you read it. This is not only good for understanding the material in the first place, but it will also quickly remind you of the concepts involved and the structure/relationships between them. One free mapping software that I like is Xmind.


7

I agree with both Jeanne Boyarsky's answer and matthewp's answer but I would just like to add the following: Make your promises more precise. For example you say "I will dedicate to my study for a long time" which is rather vague. How much is a long time? It will work better if you quantify it and say for example "At college I will visit all lectures for ...


7

Reading the lecture materials before going to class is a good practice. If you find it taking too much of your time, then you may want to set a specific amount of time for it. Do not aim for understanding most of what the lecturer would cover, otherwise there is not much point attending lectures, but use the set time to get a feel of what the lecture would ...


6

When I started using a similar system I ran into the same issue with motivating myself when things were not staying on course. My solution was to change how I assessed things from a dont-break-the-chain approach to a percentage based system and adding additional life objectives. Using a spreadsheet, each day I'd track what objectives were achieved and ...


6

I used to have the same problem, you generally break your promise to do something because it's either boring or not very rewarding. So, if you continue doing the thing, in the end it gets you stressed and you want to go back to your comforts again. Here are some things that helped me stay in focus. step 1- You need to find the right reason, like, why am ...


6

Chances are that some of your fellow students have understood more than you, and sometimes it's the opposite way around. Therefore it's very effective to form study groups in which you discuss the material together. The probability of everyone failing to understand a concept is usually low.


5

Here are the steps that my successful friends and I follow : Daily wake up before 5'o'clock (most successful CEOs do this) Have 8 hours of sleep Do meditation(it gives you perfect peace) Study Make up a study plan; while doing this allot some time for socializing and having fun Before studying develop strong interests on that so that you won't get bored. ...


5

You either: Get the teacher's guide Get someone to check your work Find similar problems that you do have the answers for and use the same technique You check your work, then check it again, and possibly again I find teacher's guides are often quite useful for reasons beyond just the answers, though. In addition, some textbooks have just the answers ...


5

Go for a walk. Change of scenery, fresh air, exercise. And it's cheap!


5

The whole concept of Undergrad studies is to build a foundation in the body of knowledge you chose to study. It is rather a matter of discipline to determine the optimal balance between depth of a subject and getting better grades. As an undergrad, you are required to have good breadth rather than depth and the examination system would attempt to gauge your ...


5

It's wrong to think about people as "passive" or "active" thinkers. We're both, only at different times (for example, i'm really passive when i've just woken up, but active after a class). The point is to move from a passive state to an active one, which is a pretty hard process. I'd advise you to build up a varied study patern: go to classes, read the ...


5

For me it's always been about figuring out how to replace the things I am taking out of my life....not just taking things out. For instance, "Never waste time with stupid friends" - anytime this seems like it might happen, have a plan for what you'll do....like "call another friend", or study, or something/anything. It's hard to just stop doing something ...


4

I came from an engineering background and moved into comp science and I found Information Theory quite easy and interesting. It was not so much that I was more talented than everyone else, but because it used mathematics that I was already familiar with at the time. I had a natural 'feel' for information theory because I knew how it functioned. For ...


4

One general key to not feeling dejected is to avoid comparing yourself to others. You might find it hard to avoid that way of thinking at first, but try to keep in mind that most happy people do not spend much time and energy comparing themselves to others. You may find that you have a some edges over a few of the graduates from the prestige schools. For ...


4

There are a lot of techniques out there for how to absorb information; and, it pains me to say, learning style is somewhat idiosyncratic, and the fundamental concept is to actually learn the material - not just memorize it. So, with those dire portends in mind, here are some strategies I learned from a high school course, reiterated again by almost every ...


4

First, don't be hard on yourself. It kinda seems like that is what you are doing. What you are experiencing is natural. Commonly know as "senioritis". I'm one year into my second Master's and I'm already experiencing it. My advice, remind yourself why you are getting this degree. Remind yourself of all the energy and effort you have spent getting this far. ...


4

I suggest you to keep an agenda on paper where you record in 15 or 30 minutes increments how you are using your time. Use a timer to remind yourself to document what you did. After about two weeks, analyse your output and see how you are using and applying your time. You will certainly discover things to improve, time sink. Working on your work pattern and ...


4

I don't think it's about your mind being active or passive, but more about knowing how to read a book. Adler's How to Read a Book could be a good start for you. And since the question asks for some practical tips, I am going to share some here as well. Granted I wouldn't call myself an active reader, but I do embrace interactive reading, which to me is a ...


4

I think the appealing aspect of Call of Duty and other multi-player games is the real-time competition with other players. When I was a university student and there were topics I didn't like too much, I found studying in group, with people better than me at a certain subject, very performing. This has always encouraged me to study more in detail and not ...


4

Try getting up and teaching the material to a willing-to-listen friend, someone else in the class, a study group, or even an empty classroom (real or imaginary). Teaching the material can help you study more effectively in several ways: If you're able to teach to a group of people who are also learning the material, then while they benefit (hearing you go ...


4

That's completely normal. I might be wrong but to attain a degree, the volume of information that you cover is far more than you can hope to remember. The aim behind covering a lot of courses is to develop an understanding of the tools you have available as you move ahead in your field, not to memorize every esoteric technique covered. In a typical CS ...


3

I disagree with Josh Bruce on some of his tips. In fact, I think some of it is misinformation. There is no such thing as a "type of learner." There is very little evidence that it exists. Also, rereading your notes is a terrible way of learning. It increases your fluency (i.e. your perception is that the material is easy). This will lead to overconfidence. ...


3

Your brain is already beginning to wind down as you see the end in sight. This is actually very common, people who are 'Finishers' are much rarer than 'Deliverers', and the generally accepted view is that there isn't a magic bullet here... You just need to force your way through. With one month left, forget motivation and just use persistence. Plan how much ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible