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8

The worst case scenario is when you're not being productive nor having fun. Take a day off (you've already lost many, so it won't matter much) and relax. Avoid thinking about studying and try to actually have fun. That's your 'rest day'; you can take one a week, as a reward for studying. It's hard to focus in working/studying when the objective is ...


5

Please watch the talk Study Less, Study Smart by Dr. Marty Lobdell. It will help you a lot. To sum up the talk in a few points: Start studying early. Your brain can only handle a few concepts at a time. It takes time for the concepts to sink in. Don't keep everything for the last moment. Take breaks every 25 minutes. The human attention span lasts ...


3

By the sounds of it you sounds like you know what you want but you don't how how to reach your goal, where to start, or who to go to. Let me tell you my story, and see how we relate. I graduated with a degree in Business Economics and decided I wanted to work with computers. I got a job in an IT support company and after a couple of months I decided ...


3

Something to add to the already very good suggestions: start with the absolute smallest thing you can manage. Make a small commitment. Let's say you have to write a paper, and you really don't want to. The longer you procrastinate and resist, the bigger the job will be in your mind. After a few days of doing nothing, and worrying about how you're doing ...


3

Little and Often One of the secrets of studying effectively is to do little and often. 10 minutes every day is more effective than 60 minutes one day and nothing the rest of the week. This is because you'll (1) retain more and (2) build up the habit of studying. Small Successes The other great secret is to start small. It is better to decide to study for ...


3

Some tips: Make it interactive. Are there practice problems you can do? Can you draw a mind map as you study? Make it smaller. Set small goals for yourself. You will understand one tricky concept. Take notes. Make yourself identify the key points.


2

The best reply I can give you comes from Dr. Marty Lobdell's talk titled "Study less, Study Smart. To sum up the talk in a few points: Start studying early. Your brain can only handle a few concepts at a time. It takes time for the concepts to sink in. Don't keep everything for the last moment. Take breaks every 25 minutes. The human attention span ...


2

I was an engineering student and had similar issues. Long since I have been a full-time student, I have learned that you can make even the most mundane topic interesting by upping the intensity of your studying efforts. Instead of setting aside 2 hours to get something done, try to get it done in 45 minutes. Try to make it such that you have generated ...


2

Take charge! Get control! What I learned to do in the last stages of my engineering studies is this: As soon as I started a new course, I made a plan for it, what literature is there to read? What laborations are there? What exercises (if it's math)? Then I took this complete list of what there was to do and broke it down into manageable chunks. Now, ...


2

I had faced the same issue a while ago. I was coming back from work like a zombie, I was trying to learn new things but was getting completly distracted by same stuff as you. I was sleeping 6-7h per night and on the morning I was just taking a shower and was going to work. I remembered this expression that say "Life belongs to people who get up early". I ...


2

I like Tachibana ian's answer. And greatly recommend what MÃ¥rten suggested. Break it down. You cannot chew it all at once. Actually just the magnitude will discourage you, when you see it from a high level. I'm a software engineer, your problem is something a lot of people face everyday in real life. I use excel sheets and trello.com to split bigger tasks ...


2

Personally, I use to take notes on folder ring bilder, in order to avoid large amount of chaotical and unused paper, notepads, notebooks and so on.. This solution is optimal because you can save paper and organize later your notes collecting them by categories. I also want to be able to quickly reference back to my notes when I need to [...] I use ...


2

There is an excellent course called "Learning How to Learn". It has helped many people, is free and doesn't take very long to complete(4 weeks).


2

Getting focus at home. Your room is likely to be the least convenient place to study. It probably is stuffed with things that can easily become a source of distraction, and - as far as I've understood - you're used to have a great part of your spare time in it. What should you do? Make your personal room a place where you can focus easily, remove the ...


2

If you prefer paper for taking notes, a disk-bound notebook such as Circa or Atoma might work for you. That means you can carry a skinny on with dividers with you, with just the amount of pages you need, and at a later point rearrange the pages in that notebook or into other notebooks as you see fit, and throw away the pages that no longer serve you at all.


2

People will probably give you quick techniques that don't last and I guess since you are going to school this upcoming fall semester I will just give you the long lasting technique that will take you throughout college. Almost every course is difficult once you perceive as difficult. If it is difficult in your head it will be difficult no matter what you do. ...


2

Stop doing things that you don't want to be doing. If you don't love your work to the fullest, you'll work to survive and keep doing what you don't like to do. That makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. If you're good enough (especially in IT), you'll get a great job with great pay anyway. Having said that, I do think you could learn more from a current ...


2

There were 3 big rules I remember from the Math department at my uni. if you work reduce your hours - Working even 20 hours a week is a huge time-constraint. Reduce your work-hours Do not fall behind! - Get help , if you are stuck, as soon as you can ! Take good notes, and review after class! My friend made a "cheat sheet" of how to pass a class. He ...


2

Pretend to like it. Make it an acting challenge. You'll have to it anyway and if you do, you might as well (pretend to) enjoy it.


1

As mentioned, pomedoro is a great tool for some tasks, however I agree that coding and some other tasks requre a higher zone out to fully dive into the subject. In your case pomodoro is nothing more than a tool that helps you not to overload with your tasks. I want to suggest you not to focus on the tools but focus more on the book that you are reading as ...


1

Personally, I let the context decide whether I go for the break immediately or keep working for a little bit longer. One of the main advantages of the Pomodoro technique is that it tempers your enthusiasm. A flow state is like a chain reaction, very powerful, but if you let it run its course it'll burn up all your energy, and then you won't get back into ...


1

The previous answers are all incredibly comprehensive - I will target my answer at the more systemic issue. That is, to effectively study, you need to get in the habit of studying. There are many approaches you can take to creating habits, but the research (see e.g. B.J. Fogg's Tiny Habits, Robert Maurer's One Small Step...) increasingly points towards ...


1

The truth in this is that: when you are facebooking and watching tv you don't really see the time going. The worst is when you don't have a timetable for the day. It is the worst thing because you end up doing nothing, you procrastinate and at the end of the day you tell yourself tomorrow I will do better. First rule I learnt was to make a timetable. Right ...


1

Sorry for the late answer, here are some tips I find useful: Divide your time between work and play: Set some time for studying, and some for other activities. Make sure the time you allot for studying is not large enough to cause fatigue, not small enough to result in negligible productivity and the time allotted to other activities is not large enough to ...


1

My suggestion is to reserve several pages at the back of your pad (or keep these in a separate notebook). One page for each topic you are taking notes in. Title each index page and whenever you take notes in that topic note the page number(s) and a one line summary on the index page. Number pages as you progress through the notebook, and if you need or ...


1

If you prefer taking notes on paper, there is a very neat way how to organize them in a ruled journal using "tags" In your journal reserve each line of the very last page (which I'll call index page) for a specific tag. Then, add a bold mark on the back side of each page that covers this tag at the same position/height as the line containing the tag on your ...


1

I would recommend you to use Evernote tool. They have browser plugins, android and iOS apps too. You can create notebooks and keep your notes organized and access them anywhere. Its searchable too which makes your knowledge discovery easy. Also try adding color tags to the notes in ever note to easily identify your interest areas.. Hope this answer helped ...


1

I used to have the same problem but the quote "Amateurs wait for inspiration, the rest of just get up and go to work" by Stephen King did the trick for me. I used to make excuses of not feeling enough inspired to do the work I liked, having gone through the same situation, I can recommend you the following: Take a day off, and on this day do not ...


1

You can do this. Get a good nights sleep. Exercise 20 mins when you wake. Coffee and light breakfast. Start from chapters 3 in each subject. Read each chapter until you understand it. Then move to the next. Spot check on the exercises. Sleep when you are tired, eat lightly when you are hungry, drink plenty of water, Yoga or stretching before you sleep. ...


1

From the tone of your question, my impression is you are usually a "B" student and are now trying in your last year to up your game to get all A's. You need to look at the factors around you and your study habits to see how they are contributing and detracting from your ability to focus on your studies and retain the information. As noted by Little Child, ...



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