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8

The worst case scenario is when you're not being productive nor having fun. Take a day off (you've already lost many, so it won't matter much) and relax. Avoid thinking about studying and try to actually have fun. That's your 'rest day'; you can take one a week, as a reward for studying. It's hard to focus in working/studying when the objective isn't ...


7

Go to the gym immediately after work, eat something a few hours after lunch and something right after work as well. When you get used to this, and when you are not hungry, it's not hard at all. Try to get a friend to go to the gym with, that way, you won't just have to tell that stupid excuse to yourself, you'll also have to tell it to your friend ;-) ...


6

If you can find something interesting in the course you are learning, then obviously this is a positive that helps you, however for some people, studying is never going to be interesting. The key factor at this point is to realise that you need to be able to motivate yourself whether or not the material is interesting. In whatever career you end up in, some ...


6

When I started using a similar system I ran into the same issue with motivating myself when things were not staying on course. My solution was to change how I assessed things from a dont-break-the-chain approach to a percentage based system and adding additional life objectives. Using a spreadsheet, each day I'd track what objectives were achieved and ...


5

The whole concept of Undergrad studies is to build a foundation in the body of knowledge you chose to study. It is rather a matter of discipline to determine the optimal balance between depth of a subject and getting better grades. As an undergrad, you are required to have good breadth rather than depth and the examination system would attempt to gauge your ...


5

Please watch the talk Study Less, Study Smart by Dr. Marty Lobdell. It will help you a lot. To sum up the talk in a few points: Start studying early. Your brain can only handle a few concepts at a time. It takes time for the concepts to sink in. Don't keep everything for the last moment. Take breaks every 25 minutes. The human attention span lasts ...


4

I don't know if there is a way to say this politely, but this really only has three interpretations, as far as I can see: You don't fundamentally want to study these subjects In general, if someone is passionate about something, they put in far more effort than you might expect. So if you were passionate about these subjects I would expect to see that ...


4

Rigid breaks in the middle of troubleshooting a problem (coding or otherwise) interrupt flow. I think Pomodoro is great for some things, but the underlying concept is more important than the exact minute by minute breakdown. Instead of a timer, I'd suggest planning ahead and working on X-page chunks at a time ... depends on the size of the book/font but 10 ...


3

If going to the gym makes you more alert, try going to the gym before work. This will have some spin-off benefits, such as raising your metabolism and alertness at work, and possibly helping productivity in itself. Then study 4 evenings out of 5. Plan in a rest day, and check out Pomodoro for effective time management. And most importantly, if you find ...


3

I have noticed a similar situation with myself. I really enjoy mathematics and am perhaps the best in my school at it. When I don't understand something I put a lot of time in until it becomes intuitive to me (one thing I like about math is that this is almost always possible). However, the notion of going out and learning it, things that I haven't ...


3

The excerpts from Wait But Why - Why Procrastinators Procrastinate and How to Beat Procrastination (insightful articles written last year, makes a good read for your case) may interest you: To understand why procrastinators procrastinate so much, let’s start by understanding a non-procrastinator’s brain: [picture] Pretty normal, right? Now, ...


3

There is an exact solution to this problem, one that is catching mainstream popularity with good empirical results. Piotr Wozniak invented the spaced repition algorithm that caters to memorization problems like yours where a large list of discrete units have to be learned (or memorized) quickly. The basic premise is to break a large corpus of knowledge, ...


3

I don't see those as being mutually exclusive. Why not learn enough for the exam on both and dive deeper into the one you are more interested in? My college had a combined class on data mining and data warehousing. I was a bit peeved because much more time was spent on the theory of the first subject and I was more interested in the practical application of ...


3

I think it's a mistake to use a regular chain in situations where you will have no choice but to break it, it will only discourage you. Instead, adapt the chain system to something that is still simple but suits your situation. If you honestly have days when you can not study, the chain only applies for days where you can. This depends on absolute certainty ...


3

I agree that don't-break-the-chain (sometimes called the Seinfeld hack) can be very powerful, but only once you have a long chain to not break. So there's a catch-22 until then. And even with a chain built up you're always in a precarious situation where one bad day can precipitate many more bad days, where you fall down a slippery slope of "one more day ...


3

I went to law school 40 years ago, long before laptops and other portable keyboarding devices. Among my classmates there were a variety of methods of keeping track of lecture material. We actually discussed among ourselves the various methods and whether one was better than another for retaining a large amount of material. It seems to be individual, based ...


3

This is not going to work for everyone but it might work for you. Try to be meta about study, collect your own study data and analyze the result of each of your study habits and methods. Compare the results and try to better results. By doing this you'll have a chance to build up a good studying habit and have fun doing it.


3

Write down what you spend all your time on for a week. That will show you where the time goes. Once you have that info, you can see: Opportunities to make your routine more efficient. Maybe you can read while exercising or something. Wasted time or things you'd prioritize differently. Maybe you spend 2 hours a week on Facebook.


3

Some tips: Make it interactive. Are there practice problems you can do? Can you draw a mind map as you study? Make it smaller. Set small goals for yourself. You will understand one tricky concept. Take notes. Make yourself identify the key points.


3

By the sounds of it you sounds like you know what you want but you don't how how to reach your goal, where to start, or who to go to. Let me tell you my story, and see how we relate. I graduated with a degree in Business Economics and decided I wanted to work with computers. I got a job in an IT support company and after a couple of months I decided ...


2

I searched for "note taking by hand vs computer memory". Of the first three hits there were mixed results: This paper says there was more retention by typing. It's an interesting paper because it examines the differences between notetaking when reading a textbook vs when in a lecture. PBS says paper is better as does this article.


2

In addition to what's already been said (I'd also recommend Anki if it fits well with your study material) there are a few other things you can consider: You should obviously make sure you have a thorough understanding of the material as without understanding it will be harder to commit to memory. You can make things stick in your mind better by going over ...


2

Anki is a perfect solution for this situation. It is a spaced repetition freeware available for most platforms.


2

It's difficult to assess your situation solely from your post, but it sounds like you are overworked. It may be the result of the stress and extra 'work' from everything that happend last year. I'd suggest you first talk to your girlfriend and family. Explain them your problem and tell them that you'll be scheduling time for yourself for the next 2-3 ...


2

Forming a habit is the hard part. Commitment and perseverance is the key. Here I'll give some tips from my experience. Hit the Gym in the morning. That way you feel pumped up for the whole day and you'll be active and productive for most part of the day. Find a Gym mate so that you'll stop giving stupid excuses and your guilty conscious will get you up ...


2

Pick one task and do it regularly. After you've got the habbit - start doing the other one as well. You don't have to go to gym everyday, btw. 2-3 times a week is OK. You don't have to study every day as well. And you don't have to do it at same days when you go to gym, obviously.


2

It is important to be able to switch between focused and diffused mode of thinking. What you describe seems like a diffused mode - freely wandering between many website without any measurable process. This mode is also useful for creativity or relaxation, but not for learning. Few tips to get you focused: Make notes of what you read. Write down every url ...


2

You may want to consider using the Pomodoro technique for studying. It's a method where you work in units of time. One Pomodoro equals 25 minutes of time. In a nutshell, this is the Pomodoro technique. Use a timer (a good web timer grooveotter, or the real deal timer) Write a list of all things you need to get done that day (be realistic) Set your timer ...


2

I was an engineering student and had similar issues. Long since I have been a full-time student, I have learned that you can make even the most mundane topic interesting by upping the intensity of your studying efforts. Instead of setting aside 2 hours to get something done, try to get it done in 45 minutes. Try to make it such that you have generated ...


2

The best reply I can give you comes from Dr. Marty Lobdell's talk titled "Study less, Study Smart. To sum up the talk in a few points: Start studying early. Your brain can only handle a few concepts at a time. It takes time for the concepts to sink in. Don't keep everything for the last moment. Take breaks every 25 minutes. The human attention span ...



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