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12

If you are already doing 15 h a day of work, I’d agree that you shouldn’t be doing more, and like the other responders, would add that you might benefit from less, if you can make it more effective. Find a way to track the results of your study habits. I usually just do this mentally. As I do any work that is rated or graded, I think about how I prepared, ...


7

Reading the lecture materials before going to class is a good practice. If you find it taking too much of your time, then you may want to set a specific amount of time for it. Do not aim for understanding most of what the lecturer would cover, otherwise there is not much point attending lectures, but use the set time to get a feel of what the lecture would ...


6

When I started using a similar system I ran into the same issue with motivating myself when things were not staying on course. My solution was to change how I assessed things from a dont-break-the-chain approach to a percentage based system and adding additional life objectives. Using a spreadsheet, each day I'd track what objectives were achieved and ...


5

The whole concept of Undergrad studies is to build a foundation in the body of knowledge you chose to study. It is rather a matter of discipline to determine the optimal balance between depth of a subject and getting better grades. As an undergrad, you are required to have good breadth rather than depth and the examination system would attempt to gauge your ...


4

I don't know if there is a way to say this politely, but this really only has three interpretations, as far as I can see: You don't fundamentally want to study these subjects In general, if someone is passionate about something, they put in far more effort than you might expect. So if you were passionate about these subjects I would expect to see that ...


3

One of the tips my counselor told me is to "do it for 10 minutes long". and then try keeping that 10 mins undistracted. At the end, you have an option to go on, or go do something else. as long as you started that 10 minutes. Usually, people find themselves getting a hang of the task after 10 minutes, which allow themselves to dive in further. My roommate ...


3

Many would consider me an incredibly productive person: I hold a regular 9-5, participate in life until 8, and work on coding/personal projects from 8-midnight. I don’t sit down at my desk to work on my personal projects every night because I feel incredibly motivated. I do it mostly out of habit. Although, having motivation can definitely help with trying ...


3

That sounds like depression. Maybe look at it like an illness or ailment and find a doctor or a support group. Or get outside and get some sunshine and some exercise. Do something do anything. Once you start doing one thing, you'll want to do more (see tips section). I'm not saying "snap out of it". I'm saying recognize what it is and find a way to help ...


3

"Plan from the future". In order to have C at date Z, I need to complete B at date Y, and therefore A needs to be done at date X (X < Y < Z). That way you have good intermediate checkpoints. Then break down into smaller parts. Reward yourself. In your schedule, plan rewards as well - things you really want, maybe even think you should not have/do ...


3

In all of the studying I do, I have found that being able to take breaks whenever I want to can be detrimental. Although a 5-10 minute break every hour doesn't seem bad, you may not be breaking enough. I'd definitely recommend the Pomodoro Technique.


3

First of all, start earlier if you can. You should be reading ahead of your lectures. I think your strategy is reversed. I would make sure that I memorize the terms as early as possible. Then I would take the time to imagine and explore. Memorizing terms and facts gives you more confidence in your imagination and you may notice additional venues for your ...


3

I went to law school 40 years ago, long before laptops and other portable keyboarding devices. Among my classmates there were a variety of methods of keeping track of lecture material. We actually discussed among ourselves the various methods and whether one was better than another for retaining a large amount of material. It seems to be individual, based ...


3

I agree that don't-break-the-chain (sometimes called the Seinfeld hack) can be very powerful, but only once you have a long chain to not break. So there's a catch-22 until then. And even with a chain built up you're always in a precarious situation where one bad day can precipitate many more bad days, where you fall down a slippery slope of "one more day ...


3

I think it's a mistake to use a regular chain in situations where you will have no choice but to break it, it will only discourage you. Instead, adapt the chain system to something that is still simple but suits your situation. If you honestly have days when you can not study, the chain only applies for days where you can. This depends on absolute certainty ...


3

There is an exact solution to this problem, one that is catching mainstream popularity with good empirical results. Piotr Wozniak invented the spaced repition algorithm that caters to memorization problems like yours where a large list of discrete units have to be learned (or memorized) quickly. The basic premise is to break a large corpus of knowledge, ...


3

I don't see those as being mutually exclusive. Why not learn enough for the exam on both and dive deeper into the one you are more interested in? My college had a combined class on data mining and data warehousing. I was a bit peeved because much more time was spent on the theory of the first subject and I was more interested in the practical application of ...


2

Specifically for maths, there are good closely related discussions over at math.SE, for instance: http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/44704/how-to-study-math-to-really-understand-it-and-have-a-healthy-lifestyle-with-free/ http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/692609/how-to-be-a-successful-math-undergraduate-student ...


2

Speaking only about math as an amateur mathematician myself I have to tell you it is very hard to set deadlines. The reason is the fact that math is such an abstract field, one day you can be doing 10 pages an hour, and on other days you can't manage a page in a day. My best advice when learning math and studying is following: Know the definitions. For ...


2

Obvious advice - pick one or two interests of the lot and stick with those. But, that's not the answer you're looking for. First, as you said, many of the fields you're interested in are very vast and to be good at each of them requires many months, years of hard work. If you want to become good at all of them, it stacks up. Now, take change into account. ...


2

This is a very common problem. To get good score in exams requires two things. First one is knowledge and second one is to use that knowledge in exam in the right manner (Exam Skills: Ability to present your knowledge in the exam hall). So First acquire knowledge. Go through every concept. Try not to memorize rather try to learn every formula derivation. ...


2

Write Anki cards for everything that you consider to be basic that's covered in the university lectures that you attend. Thinking about what's basic has a similar effect than explaining stuff to a 5 year old. Using Anki afterwards allows you to make certain that the knowledge stays available.


2

I found pomodoro technique effective when studying more practical subjects but in most other cases it was interfering with the tasks at hand. Here is why: Breaks act as a distraction it's difficult to grasp the idea if you study it in two runs they prevent being sucked by the subject and forgetting about time More tiring after 4 hours of studying ...


2

Looking from another perspective, when you're using the pomodoro technique, you can drill down your tasks to make them smaller and when you finish a task and say you have some 3-5 minutes left, you can use this time to re-read your code, rethink your solution, improve it a little bit, etc. There is always a lack of time for these activities. I think this can ...


2

I do use Pomodoros on activities where I'm able to concentrate too. I actually use them to force myself to take breaks. I get up at least every other Pomodoro. And I'll write a unit test or put a TODO in a document so I can resume and get right back in the flow again quickly.


2

Short term. Does your textbook have a summaries for each chapter? Study those intensely and know them inside and out. If the summaries aren't very descriptive, skim and write down the most important idea in each page. Study these ideas intensely and try to understand what the larger emergent idea is. On the last day get together with a couple friends and ...


2

I searched for "note taking by hand vs computer memory". Of the first three hits there were mixed results: This paper says there was more retention by typing. It's an interesting paper because it examines the differences between notetaking when reading a textbook vs when in a lecture. PBS says paper is better as does this article.


2

Anki is a perfect solution for this situation. It is a spaced repetition freeware available for most platforms.


2

In addition to what's already been said (I'd also recommend Anki if it fits well with your study material) there are a few other things you can consider: You should obviously make sure you have a thorough understanding of the material as without understanding it will be harder to commit to memory. You can make things stick in your mind better by going over ...



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