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13

I use Dropbox for a long time and I am very happy with it. I follow the following process: I've Dropbox installed and all my projects are in the Dropbox folder, so they are synchronized. If I don't have Dropbox installed, I use a web browser to upload or download my files. The nice thing with Dropbox is that you can access your files everywhere. You don't ...


8

In all honesty, I view XMarks as the best option. Most other options are browser-specific, such as the Google Chrome Sync utility. The benefit of XMarks is that it does work across browsers, and personally, I like that it sticks to a single domain (i.e., it only syncs bookmarks, nothing else [password syncing was dropped]). In other words, if it isn't ...


6

Have a look at http://www.todotxt.com/ This set of tools starts from a simple txt file, the most versatile, industry-standard, non-proprietary file format that will never suffer from versioning problems or can become corrupted by program errors, and that can be stored and opened on any system imaginable. TodoTXT is a free and open-source set of tools for ...


6

Since you're already an Emacs user the obvious answer is Org-mode and it's companion MobileOrg for Android.


6

I use Delicious to save bookmarks that I may want to share (it also allows private unshared bookmarks as well). A nice feature is the ability to add tags to each bookmark and a description. In addition, you can search by tag among the shared bookmarks saved by others. For example, you can search for bookmarks tagged with "ubuntu" and you get a list of ...


6

I would use a version control system like Git, SVN, or Mercurial. (A tutorial on SVN vs. Mercurial differences). I've been using this method at work for several weeks and it's helped immensely. The main advantage of a VCS over carefully named files (as I suggested here in an answer you already saw), is that a VCS will store meta data, so you can capture ...


6

Google Docs. There's a complete revision history, and it's available where there's an Internet connection and a browser.


5

Are you required to use ppt and docx files? Proprietary formats have many disadvanges; plain text is generally preferable. Also, of course, version control works better with plain text. Consider using TeX/LaTeX or a similar text based typesetting system if possible. Bear in mind that while text formats can be converted to proprietary formats with little ...


4

I like Xmarks very much, have been using it for years now. Tried Google bookmarks but didn't like it much However, I've been using delicios and later switched to pinboard.in for more long-term, reference-like saving of bookmarks. It's a great way of researching a topic/purchase/party ideas, then tagging them appropriately and refer to them later. I used ...


4

I am happy with Remember The Milk. The Android and iPhone apps work offline and sync nicely when you're back in wifi range. The web interface works well for me on netbook, laptop, and desktop machines. And I use RTM as my primary list manager for GTD. I might also be happy with using Evernote if I were to change my workflow a bit. Evernote doesn't ...


4

I don't know Fetchnotes and Simplenote, but I use another tool for the same purpose that seems to meet all your needs: it's called evernote. I need to be able to sync my notes on my Android cell phone and various computers. There is an evernote webapp that runs in your browser, an app on android/windows/mac (and even linux ...


3

I've been using Workflowy for a while now. The mobile version works just as well as the desktop.


3

I prefer good ol' Google Docs. Not the simple one-line note. But it is great for cross-platform. It has features 1 and 2 that you describe. 3 is possible via downloading the document.


3

Things currently syncs locally over wifi, but is only available for Apple devices. They are working on a cloud sync currently - I'm not sure if they intend to keep this as an option once cloud sync is complete, but for now it does exist and work.


3

OmniFocus can be configured to sync locally. It has a number of sync'ing options, actually.


3

If it is essays and the like, why not just name them subject-date-version (if multiple versions on one day).doc? Really simple, doesn't require any clever software - inherently intuitive.


3

if you are so concerned about encryption, I don't know any self hosted app that I can assure does this. Maybe you should host your data yourself (usually specialized hosting companies are more careful with this matter). Or maybe just use Dropbox and encrypt the data yourself. To set up this, you could use files and edit them with Orgmode via Emacs. It works ...


3

I use dropbox and an app called BoxCryptor to create an encrypted folder on top of dropbox. I use it to store my passwords in a spreadsheet such that Dropbox can't see them. I also store an outline document there for use with Circus Ponies Notebook on my multiple Macs/iPhones. That's my secure solution. For To-Do management, I started using Things ...


2

If you have several computers where you are working and want to keep the files in sync, UNISON might be a good option for you: http://www.cis.upenn.edu/~bcpierce/unison/ it is free and open source platform independent can be configured very flexibly synchronizes several directories and can also manage conflicts when files have changed on both sides during ...


2

I've used Subversion (svn) for nearly three years, so my opinion is undoubtedly both biased an lacking in scope, but here it is anyway: You could install subversion on your server, and TortoiseSVN on the "clients". As I recall, TortioseSVN doesn't require admin access; still, I couldn't find that written down anywhere, so take it with the proverbial grain ...


2

Three approaches come to my mind, the last being probably closest to what you're looking for: set up a local sync server, for example with funambol, and point your CalDAV clients to use it when connected locally. This limits you to what the clients offer, and you may be searching a while to find the perfect client for your needs, or at least one that's ...


2

MyLifeOrganized can sync with Windows mobile, Android, iPhone and Blackberry locally and through the cloud service on line. I had used many other software/services but stopped on this.


2

Nirvana is looking for Android testers and it's likely they'll have a finished app out soon. For a while there I used doit.im and have found Nirvana easier to use and a better fit for the way I do GTD.


2

I'm user of dropbox and plain text files. One huge advantage is very simple editing in android environment. (And probably iphone - I'm not sure). You can even create files in offline mode. There are VIM on android, but I can't be sure it's very useful.


2

There are a whole bunch of things that satisfy everything but the emacs part of this (Google docs, dropbox, ect) - I'm using a mac and my solution would be to use google docs and then have quickCursor running so that I could edit section of text I wanted in emacs (I currently have it set up to edit everything in vim There are a whole bunch of things that ...


2

Doit.im is the only solution that I could find that really follows GTD. You have projects, context, next, someday, and they are implementing reviews. It fully syncs with mobile, web and desktop applications. But real time sync is not free.


2

In terms of richness of features, availability of Android app, and availability of Sync, nothing I've seen is better than MyLifeOrganized. It's got tons to offer in terms of organizing tasks, setting up reminders, doing backup, etc. The Android app has a nice interface and all the features you could need while you're on the go. The downside: The ...


1

I use Wunderlist (wunderlist.com) because it can sync across all my devices (Mac, iPhone, iPad), but they have clients for Android, Blackberry and Windows, too. It's very simple to use and syncs flawlessly over Wifi or mobile networks. However, syncing is just a basic feature for me. What convinced me in the end, was the possibility to share lists and todos ...


1

I have pretty much the same use requirements, and have ended up using Dropbox and Epistle. It's a flexible combination, stores all content in plain ASCII text, and supports Markdown. I use Org-mode and MobileOrg on top of that, and they actually coexist rather nicely after some configuration.


1

I think evernote would suffice your requirements. I like it very much because The UI is great I can attach pic,recording,video and sketch to the note It automatically syncs my notes online I use it as a diary also By the way you can use it on android and also online



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