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19

As a matter of fact we all at some moment of time struggled with code. some one will share it and some one will not. You will find a lot of fakers in our field. at least i have found a lot. so don't worry at all. 1) As far as your problem is concerned i truly understand what you are facing because i was in your shoes not so long ago. the solution to your ...


14

The best answer is probably at http://zenhabits.net/zen-to-done-ztd-the-ultimate-simple-productivity-system/ -- Leo Babauta literally wrote the book on Zen To Done, and this post is his introduction to the system, comparing it with GTD.


12

I've been using RTM (both web and iPhone) as my GTD system for over a year and have found it incredibly helpful and ideally suited to my needs. I originally started with this advice from the RTM blog, but quickly streamlined the system to something less complex to manage and with less overhead. What I've liked the most are the power of the smart lists and ...


11

Several factors impact the effectiveness of task-management tools for your circumstances. The features that you need, and which of their qualities are of most importance to you, are heavily dependent on your circumstances and the tasks you're looking to manage with said software. Issues related to your circumstances include: Workgroup involvement Number ...


11

In my opinion, the reason that breaking down tasks works is because it makes your vision for what you want done more concrete. Breaking down tasks more achieves this better, but it also takes up more of your time before you actually get started working. Probably the best thing to do is to break down your tasks a fair amount at first. (There's a limit to ...


11

This is a question looking for subjective answers but a common one, so I'll give it a go. I know exactly how the above feels and I think it's a motivation issue. To address it I find that I need to things to get going again: A relatively simple task/job that has a clear requirement(s)/goal(s). It's something that I can complete in a day or less. Even ...


11

I've found two concepts, projects and next actions, which are a key part of the GTD system, to be particularly helpful for this kind of problem. In brief, the idea is to maintain a list of projects, which are usually high-level goals, that will take significant time and effort to achieve. For example, "write paper about structural advantages of geodesic ...


10

I use Checkvist with Mark Forster's AutoFocus 4 method. It has minimal graphics to show your progress, but I love it for the keyboard shortcuts.


10

It doesn't recommend handling task dependencies, because if done properly it shouldn't be a problem. Why is that? Because a task that is dependent on an unfinished task shouldn't be in your Next Actions.


10

The problem you're struggling with is one of the core issues addressed by David Allen's Getting Things Done. Consider the to do list items go to bank and work on thesis. Assuming your banking task is fairly straightforward, this is a simple action. The second is a several-year endeavor. When most people look at a list like this their mind is drawn to the ...


10

That's a book by Steven Covey. The important take-away I learned it worry about "quadrant 2", i.e., important but not urgent. It is easy to be caught in the urgent important and urgent not-important and never get to quadrant 2.


9

This is where maintaining a list of current projects comes in handy. Keep a version of it in priority order, with (if applicable) deadlines noted on it. When your superior asks you to add another task, provide them a copy of the list and ask them where on the list the new task falls. In some cases, just showing them the list solves the problem, because ...


9

I would follow this tip from Hemingway: The best way is always to stop when you are going good and when you know what will happen next. If you do that every day … you will never be stuck. Always stop while you are going good and don’t think about it or worry about it until you start to write the next day. That way your subconscious will work on ...


9

Scheduling tasks that do not really have a particular target time would just create an overhead in your system, where you'd have to keep rescheduling them whenever you didn't get them finished that day or even have rather worked on other things. Since they're all non-urgent, though they sure may be important and even critical for your personal goals, I ...


9

Standard time management: Prioritize what you want/need to get done that day. Delegate what you can. Split up tasks so can work on them at best times. Learn to say no. Sometimes tasks just don't need to be done.


9

This site is devoted to practical, tangible steps and systems that can increase personal productivity, but perhaps the most important insight is that all systems have their limits and that it's important to be able to realize if and when you've reached a point where your commitments exceed your ability to meet them. Only then can you make the transition ...


9

I use a constellation of apps as my system, email, calendar and to do apps. There are a couple of practices that keep these systems from going stale. Set up some back burner categories These usually go by the name of @somedayMaybe, @waitingFor, @moviesToSee, @thingsToDoWhenInTheCity, etc. You will only review these lists when you are in the mindset of ...


9

The answer is simple and straightforward: Minimalism. Don't fall into the trap (that I already did one thousand times) of GTD strategies and Time management Gods/Gurus (or whatever they call themselves) which aim to sell something "complicated" in order to present themselves as more clever and smart than us. Through my research crusade all these years to ...


8

My experience is that it helps to: A) Have a routine. B) Write it down. C) Finish something every time you start. Routine With a good routine, a great many decisions you would think about are already made. Unless you work in a factory, your first day in a job or role will be far from routine. Here are some suggested attributes for the routine you ...


8

The first thing to do is check to see if you're being asked for an estimate or a commitment. Especially in software development, these words are often misused. An estimate should be a range with an indication of your confidence in the values. For example, you might estimate a project as 25% confidence of accomplishment in 5 days, 50% in 8 days, 90% in 12 ...


8

Ask yourself; My tasks realy has to these unimportant details? If you say yes, then they are not unimportant. They are a part of your task. Keep doing them. Some of your tasks could include a lot of details. So, how can you define "finished task" with not doing some details? Also don't bored with doing them. Learn how to get fun with doing them. If you say ...


8

Your overall problem is described by David Allen in "Getting Things Done" as the widget cranking problem. If your job is to crank widgets, you know what "done" looks like. The pile of uncranked widgets gets cranked and moved to the done pile. The issue is that your projects are more ambiguous than that. So what you need to do is resolve the ambiguity by ...


8

I will block out time on my calendar each day for similar tasks. For example, in my practice I am not the best at returning calls, so I block out time day for making and returning calls. If you accept that everything on your calendar is an promise, either to yourself or someone else (in the case of an appointment), you might find it much easier to know out ...


7

In your example: if you won't read the book in one sitting, and can meaningfully split it up into chunks, then doing so is probably a good idea. Generally: It's more motivating to have something that you can start an know will be able to finish within a reasonable timeframe and then tick off your list than to have a task that comes back to the top of your ...


7

I think you're on the same path with Piotr Wozniak! Please read his story here: Want to Remember Everything You'll Ever Learn? Surrender to This Algorithm He is the inventor of the SM2 algorithm used in SuperMemo and it gave insight to many other similar applications such as Anki and Mnemosyne. That algorithm might give you some insight. Spaced repetition ...


7

An often overlooked aspect is that such software should be lightweight, simple and fast. If the software requires a lot of interactivity, it is going to distract you from your real work. Simplicity helps.


7

At the end of the day, you can't force people to do what you need them to do, but there are ways you can encourage people to do so: Some ideas: Set clear expectations. One of the reason people procrastinate is that they aren't quite clear on what they're supposed to be doing or by when. For example, when your doctor promises to send your certificate, ask ...


7

Kramii's answer has a lot of good ideas for ways to manage the dependencies on other people, and improve your relationships with them so they're more likely to do what you need. The step I don't see there is one I find essential, keeping a "Waiting For" list. That's a list of all the things I'm waiting for other people to do. Most of the items on the list ...


7

I think you're actually closer to the mark than you think with "stare at the problem for 30 min, hoping for clarity to come", although what I recommend is more focused and deliberate than that. Qualitative and subjective work is, by nature, hard to definitely be done, because it's not a question of getting the answer correct. With a paper you write, the ...



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