Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Your overall problem is described by David Allen in "Getting Things Done" as the widget cranking problem. If your job is to crank widgets, you know what "done" looks like. The pile of uncranked widgets gets cranked and moved to the done pile. The issue is that your projects are more ambiguous than that. So what you need to do is resolve the ambiguity by ...


7

I think you're actually closer to the mark than you think with "stare at the problem for 30 min, hoping for clarity to come", although what I recommend is more focused and deliberate than that. Qualitative and subjective work is, by nature, hard to definitely be done, because it's not a question of getting the answer correct. With a paper you write, the ...


5

If you are not afraid of spending some time on learning you should try org-mode. Org mode is for keeping notes, maintaining TODO lists, planning projects, and authoring documents with a fast and effective plain-text system. It allow stuff like: it is GPL it is fully text file based, so really easy to sync with dropbox/git/your choice free-form file ...


4

All are viable strategy. There is a methodology called Getting Things Done (GTD). One thing in it is to list what you can do with different pieces of time in different contexts. This lets you choose the most appropriate thing to do. If you are waiting for a programming process to finish, you probably have a good idea of how much time if you have. So pick a ...


4

Personally, I think you are better off learning something by trying to solve a problem. Have a project in mind, even if it is a made up project, and learn everything you need to solve that problem. Rinse and repeat, choosing a different type of problem each time. There are disadvantages of this method. For example, you may miss out on whole areas of the ...


4

What you have is a set of reminders which are not tied to any context. You will get a reminder to buy new batteries when you are at home, or a reminder to try a different reading style while you are at work. I could schedule reminders for various times ex 5pm - get groceries. But I can't be sure whether I'll actually be driving at that time. By doing ...


4

If you are not afraid of the command line I recommend that you take a look at taskwarrior (TW), although you would have to implement some of the features yourself using user defined attributes. Here is a comparison with your requirements: cloudless. TW keeps a local database and can be synced using a TW server (FLOSS, there are services like freecinc if ...


3

I have started app called todoist. It has progress bar, karma, priority, and works with chrome, outlook, gmail, and apps for kindle (using that now), ios, and Windows. I fell in love with its simplicity. I added recurring task like this "every Friday @ 9am" and worked perfect. I paid for premium version because I like it and want to see developers eat :) ...


3

If you're having trouble with motivation due to goal vagueness, consider breaking up your tasks in subtasks with goals that satisfy the S.M.A.R.T criteria. These are goals that are specific and measurable, leaving you in no doubt whether you've accomplished a goal or not.


3

Divide your tasks into the four quadrants Urgent/Not urgent and Important/Not important. Then for some time register the time spent in each task. This lets you calculate how much time you spend on each category. From there you can decide how much time you want to spend in each category. Maybe this exercise is already enough to make you ask yourself each ...


3

Much of personal productivity methodology seems to be based on reducing the strain on the brain of deciding what to do. No, it isn't. Methodologies you refer to are about making decisions once and at a right time, instead of dragging them along, and about externalizing memory (since our brain seems to be more fit for recognition rather than ...


3

I think storing the complete list of tasks outside of the brain is part of many time-management systems, including GTD you've mentioned. I don't remember GTD advocating detailed and rigid planning though - I think it is more about easily finding the next actionable item. For the methods of prioritizing the tasks for your day/session you could check Mark ...


2

When you have only a vague notion of what you want to accomplish, it's helpful to stand back and visualize. You need to clarify exactly what it is you want to accomplish. Clarify what you want to accomplish When visualizing ask yourself these questions. Where are you? Who are you with? What are you looking at? How far off in the future are you ...


2

There is no silver bullet that will solve your current solution, but there are ways to improve your situation over time: Reduce the sense of urgency in your life By spending more time in the Quadrant II, you will slowly reduce the number of urgent but not important (or non-goal) tasks. You will always have maintenance tasks, but they should be kept to the ...


2

Firstly I would lose the "important" label. If its not that important then you probably shouldn't be doing it at all. I can appreciate that Covey's Quadrant was an important milestone in determining priorities but David Allen's Areas of Focus and Horizons of Focus are a more useful paradigm to determine the priority of a task at any given moment. In this ...


2

Consider what you're able to accomplish safely while pushing the stroller. You might be able to take a phone call or listen to something technical. Perhaps you could get a baby carrier (like a BabyBjorn) and wear the kid. That way you'd have both hands free and wouldn't have to worry so much about running the stroller into things. I'd recommend slowing down ...


2

I read this from a book (Cal Newport - Straight A student) Write your commitments in a book and if you do not do them when you are supposed to, you need to give a reason why you haven't done it. If it is a good reason, you can rationalize it, but if not you will have to face yourself with writing down a lame reason. Might help kick you into action. ...


2

This really depends on the types of goals you're setting. For short term, simple goals I just add them to an electronic to-do list that I have got into the habit of checking every time I get back from work and at weekends. I also have a list of repeat tasks - things like taking the rubbish out on sunday night, cleaning out the fridge, organising the bills. ...


2

Get counseling if possible or at least someone to talk to. Having someone to bounce of your thought IMO helps a lot with questioning unreasonable thoughts you might have. Seeing a professional counselor will also mean that you get access to medication which might help you. At times I was in a situation similar to yours (although not that severe), these are ...


2

I apply the following advice to myself and it's working: Always have time for the 'nothing box' e.g. time where you do absolutely nothing. Technically speaking you unwind and rgroup Learn to set better targets by analyzing data. It's normal to over or under estimate one's ability to meet targets. Timely progress reviews gives one insight whether we are ...


2

I think cherrytree might be what you are looking for. http://www.giuspen.com/cherrytree/ You can insert check-boxes (Edit->Insert special character) and tick them or untick them with a click. http://www.giuspen.com/topic/cherrytree-on-mac-osx/ The image is from Linux, but it's also available for Windows. I don't see it for OSX, but somebody got it ...


2

Taskwarrior, http://taskwarrior.org/ is free, open source, very flexible command line based task manager that you can use as simply or complicatedly as you wish. It has dependencies, which you can easily use like subtasks, start date, due date, waiting date, tagging and host of other features, including syncing to a server you can control yourself. There is ...


2

Yes, you are micromanaging at the runway levels because there is some work at the higher levels of perspective that you have not been doing on a periodic basis. The difference between your two approaches is the level of commitment you explicitly devote toward learning French relative to other areas of focus in your life. You are cycling between two extremes. ...


2

My strategy: Never set a goal you don't mean to achieve. If you think you can run 5k in 25 min in 2 months, don't aim for 24 min just to be ambitious, aim for 25 and let anything more be an overachievement. I do this to avoid dreaming, which is always a hazard when setting goals. Always set concrete goals, even if the intention isn't very concrete. If you ...


2

A few quick thoughts: Don't wait until February. Start now, even if your start is a small one. The work you're doing will be a lot easier if you exercise your productivity skills - they're not something to fall back to once the work is done. See this as an opportunity to reboot your routines, to drop less valuable ones and pick up healthy habits. ...


1

Preliminary remark: I've tried to set up a MYWN-system with Emacs org-mode and I'm working with it for more than a year now, however it's not yet complete. I'll try to add more details in the following days. My emacs setup is very cluttered at the moment, so I don't want to share it as is. How to use Emacs org-mode for M. Linenberger's MYWN* *Master Your ...


1

Your answer is in books on the subject. They usually follow a familiar pattern because that is proven to work: Introduction -> concepts -> basic principles -> simple examples -> main sub-areas, eveything gradually turning more complex. Of course your entry level may vary. Actually that is my recommendation: Buy a (tutorial) book and follow that through. ...


1

Check out this article. It lists 5 different ways to use GT from your desktop, which, I believe, includes what you're seeking. http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/five-killer-ways-to-use-google-tasks/


1

IMO the best strategy is to do something that requires little effort to switch to (e.g. a task that needs you to fetch special tools or opening a program with a long load time would be bad tasks). If you don't know how long your wait time will be go for mutiple short tasks to cut down the item count on your todo list. If you want to know what to do during ...


1

I think what you do during the wait time should be determined by if the next task you do will also require x amount of wait time. The worst thing would be you're half done with 3 "high" priority task and waiting for response from 3 different people in order to complete them. I would suggest to do something that can be completed quickly with the estimated ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible