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9

I use a constellation of apps as my system, email, calendar and to do apps. There are a couple of practices that keep these systems from going stale. Set up some back burner categories These usually go by the name of @somedayMaybe, @waitingFor, @moviesToSee, @thingsToDoWhenInTheCity, etc. You will only review these lists when you are in the mindset of ...


8

I will block out time on my calendar each day for similar tasks. For example, in my practice I am not the best at returning calls, so I block out time day for making and returning calls. If you accept that everything on your calendar is an promise, either to yourself or someone else (in the case of an appointment), you might find it much easier to know out ...


7

I work as a freelancer, so this question pretty much defines my life. In my market, due to holidays and budget years ending, I pretty much have a vacation from mid-November through Valentine's Day. During the rest of the year, it's frantic feast or famine. While a workplace situation may be somewhat different, I tend to be "productive" during my downtime ...


7

At the end of the day, you can't force people to do what you need them to do, but there are ways you can encourage people to do so: Some ideas: Set clear expectations. One of the reason people procrastinate is that they aren't quite clear on what they're supposed to be doing or by when. For example, when your doctor promises to send your certificate, ask ...


7

Kramii's answer has a lot of good ideas for ways to manage the dependencies on other people, and improve your relationships with them so they're more likely to do what you need. The step I don't see there is one I find essential, keeping a "Waiting For" list. That's a list of all the things I'm waiting for other people to do. Most of the items on the list ...


7

It sounds like you need to trick yourself into being accountable. Possible ways: Find a "buddy" to keep each other on track. (People often suggest this for exercise.) Commit to posting an update on your progress weekly on Twitter or Facebook. That way, you will feel like someone will know if you didn't do it. Ask someone to remind you. I've actually ...


5

Personally I'm using trello for my own tasklist. Boards - group of interest (Generic TODO, Books to Read, Articles to read, etc.) Tasks (or object in your case) - simple but feature rich entities. You can add checklist, comment, description, etc. You can use trello at desktop and mobile. Mobile app works even in offline but has degraded functionality.


4

I think the appealing aspect of Call of Duty and other multi-player games is the real-time competition with other players. When I was a university student and there were topics I didn't like too much, I found studying in group, with people better than me at a certain subject, very performing. This has always encouraged me to study more in detail and not ...


3

I don't want to constantly call people verifying that they're doing their jobs. You have to determine what is going to disrupt your life more: the other person not doing their part or your making a phone call? Sometimes you do have to settle for the lesser evil. The key is providing consequences. Provide the service I expect and I will in return be a ...


3

I spent nearly 18 years in professional consultancy, which, similarly to dwwilson66, has periods of extreme load (100hr weeks) and very light periods (30hr weeks) so making best use of this time is essential to being successful. Options include: Write up documentation. The bane of everyone's life, so it often isn't done, or is done badly. Use this time to ...


3

The answer provided by @aszekely is perfect. I will just add some tips I derived form my own experience of fighting (successful) with procrastination - and daily routine in particular. Try ... buying a plant (flower)! As far as I can judge from your question, what you want is to try to produce the same psychological effect for completing small tasks as if ...


3

I'm not aware of any such software that already exists. You did not tell what operating system(s) you are using. There are several options that come to my mind for building such a structure yourself: Microsoft Visio or similar software I think, you could build such thing yourself e. g. with Microsoft VISIO or a similar software (there might be free ...


3

My method for organizing my days is mostly based on lists and consistent behavior. I have a number of "to-do" lists (Personal, Work, Grocery, etc.) - as an example, below is my list for tomorrow. You will notice I don't try to plan for every minute of my day, that's because (as you mentioned) you get unexpected calls from colleagues needing something. If ...


3

From personal experience, the acquisition of a second stapler has proven to be a boon to my business. I am a freelancer, and one of the ways I keep track of expenses is to staple project receipts to the final invoice I send to my client. This allows me to track and verify payment for reimburseable expenses, and calculate profitability based on how many ...


2

Emacs org-mode can do that. The software is open source, free to use and platform independent. However, if you have never worked with Emacs, it might need some time to learn the basics. I have done that less than a year ago (starting from scratch - after working with a lot of applications with a much nicer GUI) and for me it's absolutely worth it: ...


2

One application i used previously that has the capability to show dependencies is My Life Organized. I had stopped using it because it's design was rather dated and it was a paid app, but it looks like they just had a rather significant redesign, and there is a free trial. The amount of functionality offered with the software is staggering and there's just a ...


2

Build it into a habit. Set up a cue for it, e.g. Friday night. Set a reward, e.g. an episode of your favorite show, a favorite game, or a special dessert. Then do the task upon the cue and end it with the reward. In time, you'll automatically do it. Note that the reward is critical to this, but it doesn't have to be a major one. Febreze is sold almost ...


2

For me listening audiobooks works best. On normal free time I can't do that, because I'm usually falling asleep and losing track of plot. On the other hand, I'm also losing track of the plot when I'm doing creative work. But time when I'm washing dishes, cleaning a room, or preparing meals is perfect for listening to an audiobook. If the book is ...


2

It sounds as if your team doesn't respect you. So the first order of business is to get that respect. Apparently your estimation skills do not seem to be at the level they want, so first let's fix that. Start by keeping records, your estimate, the accepted estimate and the actual time the task took. Most people are poor estimators and you will probally see ...


2

These are the ones I know of (no experience with 'em): FancyHands (http://www.fancyhands.com/) USA-based, but can run tasks wherever you are as long as you are speaking English. Can't do tasks that require physical actions. Plans starting from $25/month to $65/month. TaskRunner.co.uk (https://www.taskrunner.co.uk/) TaskRunner is based in the UK. ...


2

Since you are open to non-software approaches I'll tell you what I do. But since what I do is a personalized version of the old Franklin Day Planner system (that I have implemented in a spreadsheet rather than their planner book) I just checked the Franklin site to see what they have. They do have a software options and from the video I don't see this being ...


2

I keep a small notebook and pen in my pocket, and write things there for later. I'm a GTD user, with intermittent Pomodoro within that when I need finer control. In GTD terms, you're asking about "Capture", how to get ideas and thoughts into your system for future processing. I've tried a number of different approaches, from various electronic tools ...


2

As the answer is individual, do this: In the beginning of the day, or the night before, select a number of daily tasks you think is good for you. Write down as many tasks as you've decided. Go ahead and dedicate your day to achieving these goals. In the end of the day, review how happy are you with your productivity and how many/much of the tasks you've ...


2

TL;DR: Don't use Evernote as a to-do tool. I find Evernote to be a great place for reference material, but not for actual to-do lists that frequently change. For that, I use a mix of two other tools instead: workflowy.com is the most fantastic outliner I've ever seen. It's minimalistic in appearance but packs the perfect amount of functionality in a very ...


2

IMDO it's not the toolset but the mental approach that works. The GTD Book and Audio Tapes really help with this; there's not real substitute for reviewing them every year or so. Concepts such as the weekly review, and breaking tasks down to 'pushing widgets' are the only things that really work. I've been through every type of todo management app out ...


2

Use the principle of Dramatic Visible Results. (This is a fun way to refer to the principle of "measurable progress", which is essential to effective change management.) How it works: Decide on something you want to do. Then before starting, set a goal -- one that is measurable enough that you can know when it is complete. For some projects, it may be ...


1

I've always found it effective to make sure that all parties know at the beginning how important their tasks are to your being able to complete the project at hand. Depending on your relationship with the people involved you can have fun with it (emails, texts, half-jokingly referring to how they are holding you up)....or you can just be professional (even ...


1

One way to cope with this is to use one or more of the following: "Waiting For" list, like in classic GTD implementation Put a reminder in your calendar Use a "Tickler File" also from GTD While it is true that you cannot change other people's behavior, it is possible to influence them. If the person promising you something is not writing it down, it is ...


1

In private life, people sometimes feel less obligated to follow through (depending on personality), so the best way to achieve results is of course a reward on completion. It can be something simple, like a trip somewhere, or plain cash. But for most people, at least here in Finland, work goes before anything else, so it really depends on their own work ...


1

I think the best way to proceed is to start afresh using what you've done so far as a guideline. As with all CS projects that generate code, there are certain decisions and counter-decisions you made in choosing certain courses of action and the only way to fully grasp why you did what you did in the way you did it is to retrace your steps. I think it's ...



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