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It looks like you're doing more than creating deadlines. You're scheduling tasks -- not just total time, but also start time and end time. I find that a deadline works best for a "final push." As in, I have someplace else I have to be at 5:30 PM, so I have to finish this by 5:00 PM. Or, if I have two significant pieces of work to do, I take a cut at the ...


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I've found that sometimes it helps, sometimes not. I've found that the most effective deadlines are those imposed by others (e.g., client=paycheck, dinner reservations are for a particular time, etc.). Self deadlines require self-discipline, as well as self awareness about your working habits and styles. Allowing an hour to create a document, but then ...


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I have been using Excel sheet for that (it's easy to maintain and swift to work with), with column A as description of repetitive tasks column B named as Period - weekly/monthly/quarter/yearly and column D as weekdays, E as date, F as Quarter no. etc. use short-cuts shift+L for Auto-filter it comes in handy. You can also have a column of priority or ...


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Well, I manage them with Microsoft Notepad. (Actually, vi.) It's worked smoothly for a decade. If you insist on something fancier, googling for "to do list" recurring finds half a dozen. (Which half dozen depends on which month you do that search...)


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I read this from a book (Cal Newport - Straight A student) Write your commitments in a book and if you do not do them when you are supposed to, you need to give a reason why you haven't done it. If it is a good reason, you can rationalize it, but if not you will have to face yourself with writing down a lame reason. Might help kick you into action. ...



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