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11

TL;DR Pick 5 books. Shelf the rest. Pick 2 Projects Shelf the rest. Pick one knowledge area until you are skilled enough to be able to answer the majority of questions on SE. Shelf the rest until that moment comes. Steve Jobs famously said (likely paraphrased from elsewhere0 that the most effective people know which projects to set aside. I am ...


9

My mother-in-law has said: "If you have a plate of frogs in front of you, eat the ugliest one first." Features of this quote: The frogs are your unpleasant tasks. They're not butterflies. One of those tasks is going to be the most unpleasant. Given that you have to do all of them, get the most unpleasant one out of the way first. Then, it gets easier. ...


6

I think your first step should be to prioritize those goals. That's a lot to have in your head at one point. The more you are doing at the same time, the more "state" has to stay in your head. Which makes it harder to get moving on it. For example, you are in the middle of at least 20 books. Pick a couple and FINISH them. Then move on to the next book. I am ...


6

Your doing everything right. I'd add find all the free podcasts and Youtube channels that cover the technologies you are interested in and stay up to date with these. For example I'm a .NET developer so follow DotNetRocks, Channel9 to name a few religiously. Also identify the people or teams who work on the technologies you use. If these people have a ...


5

I use GTD, so I have a "Someday / Maybe" list Take a look at your projects list, so put all your coding projects, cashflow ideas, and personal improvement goals on one list. Now as you look at that list, decide what you want to put on hold, and move them to your Someday/Maybe list. The rest stay on your Projects list. These will be your focus. A ...


5

Because most of us relied on ROTE memorization. Repeat until it temporarily sticks to your brain. Memorizing something isn't bad, per se. Memorizing without understanding is bad. Even today I memorize things that I know I need frequently. Think of this as a computer caching its data. If it can access data faster, it will be more productive. That is ...


4

Aside from the obvious advice to "slow down" (which I know is hard!), I would practice arithmetic and logic daily outside of this case work. For example, you could do daily Sudoku games, crossword puzzles, and/or Lumosity games. You might also want to highlight or jot down your assumptions (n=6) as you go through, so when you check your work you can also ...


4

Well, a heart attack or diabetes might be a good motivator, but they often take a lot of time to achieve. Since the knowledge of living an unhealthy lifestyle isn't a strong enough motivator for you, perhaps a practical change to your schedule might help. Take and eat a snack while you are commuting (something not messy or smelly, which won't offend or ...


4

I have been using a multiple monitor setup since DualView came out in windows. I first used it for while playing games, and then quickly added a dual monitor setup to my work computer. At my job a few years ago, I had a 4 monitor setup, but It was a more stressful job where I needed to monitor systems in real time on 2 of the 4 screens. I did not ...


3

You mention that you have a long commute. How long? Do you commute by car, train, bus? Is it possible for you to work exercise into your commute? For instance, some places have park and ride, could you ride a bicycle to such a place, then commute the rest of the way by train or bus? You also mention that by the time you are home you are "so hungry I ...


3

There is a study The Effects of Aerobic Exercise Intensity and Duration on Levels of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Healthy Men There is a result: The mos beneficiary is a 40 minutes intensive aerobic exercise. Other study: Aerobic exercise effects on cognitive and neural plasticity in older adults Given the extant literature summarised in ...


3

I once had a therapist who firmly believed in a system called 'the 50 minute hour'. It generally applies to studying, but I don't see why it can't be used for other tasks, such as lengthy chores, or things of the home improvement variety. The idea, really, is that you apply yourself to whatever it is you're doing for a solid 50 minutes, and then complete the ...


3

First of all, start earlier if you can. You should be reading ahead of your lectures. I think your strategy is reversed. I would make sure that I memorize the terms as early as possible. Then I would take the time to imagine and explore. Memorizing terms and facts gives you more confidence in your imagination and you may notice additional venues for your ...


3

I've got a few things that might be able to help you, this has been a problem for me throughout my life, causing me years of depression and pervasive suicidal thoughts. It's my hope that at least some of this will be useful to you, so you can go on living a happy life stress-free. I wish you luck on your journey! Stress, Anxiety, and Mindset: The first and ...


3

Your brain stores 7 +/- 2 things in working memory. You can keep drilling these things until they stick. Or you can encode them. Here's an example, memorize the following number: 1274191101 It goes beyond the working memory limit, so it's almost impossible to memorize with one go. Now break it down into the following.. 12/7/41 and 9/11/01, the dates of ...


3

I went to law school 40 years ago, long before laptops and other portable keyboarding devices. Among my classmates there were a variety of methods of keeping track of lecture material. We actually discussed among ourselves the various methods and whether one was better than another for retaining a large amount of material. It seems to be individual, based ...


3

The best thing I know is to browse Stack Overflow, which you already do. Whenever I encounter some new technology or toolbox in the world, I have already at least seen references to it at Stack Overflow. I would never feel so oriented without that unique presentation. Try to visit a local User Group and meet real people doing work that relates in some way ...


3

What i do to be "one of the updated" is less hands on courses on new techs but following hackers, who are well known in their respective communities, to get something like a birds eye view of the industry. This way you don't have to spend time going through the information right away, but you still have good chances to not miss anything usefull. You could, ...


2

I searched for "note taking by hand vs computer memory". Of the first three hits there were mixed results: This paper says there was more retention by typing. It's an interesting paper because it examines the differences between notetaking when reading a textbook vs when in a lecture. PBS says paper is better as does this article.


2

I used to have a 24" LCD in addition with my MBP 15". Here are some of the use cases: Coding: IDE on primary screen and resource on secondary screen. Reading: Take notes on primary, material on secondary. Web programming: IDE on primary, webpage result on secondary. productivity: GTD tools on secondary for reference, e.g. OmniFocus or Evernote where you ...


2

Use graph paper to align your numbers. Read the problem more slowly and more deliberately. Visualize the answer in your head before you write anything down. Set a measurable standard and record the results. Practice until you can achieve that standard on a regular basis.


2

Write Anki cards for everything that you consider to be basic that's covered in the university lectures that you attend. Thinking about what's basic has a similar effect than explaining stuff to a 5 year old. Using Anki afterwards allows you to make certain that the knowledge stays available.


2

The ultimate advice I was given is this: If there is even a shadow of doubt, don't buy it. And it really does apply, specially with clothes.


2

Option 1: Parallelize tasks Can you program while travelling between cities? In the inability to reduce travel time, I would check if it is possible to do a task in parallel. I myself program, so I realize programming while travelling has the following issues: battery life (bring your charger to work, charge your laptop there) coding offline is more ...


1

This technique will get u thru ur exams but u wont remember anything after the exams are done. It is better to understsnd well the material and memorize it for the first time early on - u dont want to leave that to the last minute, things could happen,emergencies,... - then when u r revising you can memorize it again before ur exam and that way u wont start ...


1

If you are concerned about memorising things then look into memory techniques - there is a guy called 'ron white' who offers some good courses in this area. I used to find doing mind-maps also improve recall. Doing things last minute is fine as long as what you are doing doesn't require deep thought that requires time to digest things.


1

I think this approach is pretty well but start working on the subject on regular basis. If you start doing so, you would not get the headache of memorizing the things just some days before the exam. And even if You will give very little time for the subject but on regular basis you would not forget it. Having Einstein theory is pretty well but for ...


1

I believe that aerobic exercises (i.e., running) is the best for learning efficiently. This was the result of several studies covered in the excellent book: Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain http://www.amazon.com/Spark-Revolutionary-Science-Exercise-Brain/dp/0316113514


1

Anyone who truly knows probably won't be on this forum answering the question in the first place, but I'll still throw out a few tidbits. The ability to get stuff done seems to come from deep within. I've been in moods where I want nothing more than to blast through my to-do list. Other times, I've felt that refreshing my inbox repeatedly was the most ...


1

Heres some a great answer provided by (AsapScience) "When looking at the effectiveness of learning, laptops as tools for note-taking do not fair as well as plain-old pen and paper, a study has suggested. Why? Typing is faster than writing on paper, so students are more likely to just type what they're listening to word for word without interpreting. " ...



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