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19

Am I destroying my career? Yes you are... UNLESS you gain knowledge outside your current job you will become quite value-less to other companies. You have to keep yourself current. I worked as a SENIOR software developer for 11 years and when I changed positions I was clueless as to all other technologies and methodologies. I had no idea what Scrum was ...


13

One of the biggest keys to productivity that I've found in my life is setting realistic goals. On Thursday afternoon, when I think of something really cool and beneficial that I'd like to do, it's very easy to say, "Oh yeah, I'll do that on Saturday, I'll dive right in and work away on that for hours, and it's gonna be great!" On Saturday morning, I often ...


11

I've been a .NET developer for going on 12 years and I'm still as passionate today as I was on day one. If you're stuck witting console apps and don't have much variety in your development work this can be difficult. I think I would probably feel the same as you in this position. The thing that has kept .NET interesting for me is learning all the new ...


6

The short answer: Just efing do it. Force yourself if you must. The long answer: If you are a professional programmer, consult your project manager with this. Tell him that you are having trouble with your productivity and talk to him about helping you divide your work into small tasks, which you will commit on a daily basis. If you are a hobbyist / ...


5

Your not alone. I think this describes the typical day for most people. It's hard to find the time to learn new stuff and keep your skills sharp. You need to make more time in your day or use the time you have more effectively. Having little time means you probably won't be able to sit down and read a book for any amount of time so your best option may to ...


5

I suggest two things: (Generalizing on Bloodcounts answer) Use external structures that force or remind you. There are tons of those you can think of: A list of (smaller) tasks and milestones, clearly visible ( It helps to plan 'back from the future': In order to accomplish C on day Z, I need to complete B on day Y, and for that I need to complete A on ...


5

Your problem is "good colleagues", they're the ones that keep you at the level you are right now… if you want to do something get out of their lengthy lunches, long walks, useless chats. This will make you uncomfortable with your current state, but that’s the idea! As long as you stay with them, you'll be like them, don’t make friends in office just keep ...


3

Use your free time to get certifications in things you're interested in. The goal of certification will drive you and will make sure you're actually thorough. Or change jobs - I quit a very cushy and mostly enjoyable job because I had just been doing the same thing too long. 9 years in my case.


3

Consider that procrastination is caused by impulsiveness (based on research by Piers Steel). If you set large goals or possibly even medium goals, you may instinctively avoid them in order to allow impulsive behavior. If you postpone goals to the weekend, they may reach a critical point where they are so stressful it's very tempting to find a distraction and ...


3

Yes, you are destroying your career and you will struggle when the time comes to find a new software engineering position. In my experience, positions at the more interesting companies (above average salary and working conditions) are interesting in seeing your GitHub account to gauge your skills as a coder as well and demonstrating your enthusiasm in ...


3

You can improve your skills AND keep your job. You have spare time to learn - use it! Read up agile methodologies. Write unit tests. Introduce bug database. Etc. Read up Joel Spolsky advice: 12 Steps to Better Code and Getting Things Done When You're Only a Grunt and more.


3

I am in a similar situation except replace 1 hour at gym with 2-3 hours for family (kids) and 1-2 hour of homework (grad school). Here are the things I found that helped me. The biggest thing that helped me was to force myself to use it at work. This obviously depends on what you do for a job (I'm not a programmer but still work at a computer all day). I ...


3

You mention that you have a long commute. How long? Do you commute by car, train, bus? Is it possible for you to work exercise into your commute? For instance, some places have park and ride, could you ride a bicycle to such a place, then commute the rest of the way by train or bus? You also mention that by the time you are home you are "so hungry I ...


3

Well, a heart attack or diabetes might be a good motivator, but they often take a lot of time to achieve. Since the knowledge of living an unhealthy lifestyle isn't a strong enough motivator for you, perhaps a practical change to your schedule might help. Take and eat a snack while you are commuting (something not messy or smelly, which won't offend or ...


3

Cool beans! I would make the Product Owner your wife (who best knows what needs to be done in the home other than your wife), perhaps the smallest child could be the Scrum Master. I can see your smallest child loving the idea of helping you all get your job done faster and taking little messages back to mom. As you all go about your day, keep track of ...


2

Perhaps it is more productive to do nothing? I find I function optimally when working 4 days and resting 3 days. Fatigue is the biggest productivity killer, often in the form of procrastination. If you're procrastinating on your weekends, chances are that you need more rest. If you really must do something, set up a reward system for weekend tasks. Have an ...


2

Do not push yourself too much in the weekends. If you do you might not start at all. Set priorities and do not try to take on more than 2-3 tasks. Do not plan too much as you will falsely feel as if you accomplished something simply by planning. Train yourself like a dog. If you must get a task done then do it immediately and as a reward watch a movie ...


2

Option 1: Parallelize tasks Can you program while travelling between cities? In the inability to reduce travel time, I would check if it is possible to do a task in parallel. I myself program, so I realize programming while travelling has the following issues: battery life (bring your charger to work, charge your laptop there) coding offline is more ...


2

As the answer is individual, do this: In the beginning of the day, or the night before, select a number of daily tasks you think is good for you. Write down as many tasks as you've decided. Go ahead and dedicate your day to achieving these goals. In the end of the day, review how happy are you with your productivity and how many/much of the tasks you've ...


2

Your girlfriend isn't dragging you down. Posing the question in this form seems rather thoughtless. You might have asked "Is having a girlfriend dragging me down". And there, the answer is that your priorities have changed. And they should have changed, because you are now in a relationship. If you don't like it, get out of that relationship and end up being ...


2

If you want to stay at the top of your career you will need to work hard, take courses and learn the latest and greatest technologies. If you are fairly gifted and are willing to sacrifice a lot of time and effort and if you are lucky you will be promoted to management. On the other hand if you like a decent wage and would like to balance that with a ...


2

About your skills You probably are not mediocre. Check this slides from a presentation about the impostor syndrome. Not knowing about a specific technology or methodology is not deadly by itself. You could alway learn about the new shiny buzzword when you start feeling less comfortable with your current job. Also, if you pick something that interest you ...


1

Yes, you are destroying your career. I think you have two options: 1- See if you can advance within your company OUT of software development and into the business side of things. Your knowledge of the software will be an asset. And your lack of depth won't hurt you since you won't need it anymore. A lot of advanced developers end up doing that anyway when ...


1

Will it keep you happy? You might want to consider doing a degree or other higher-level course to keep you learning. Ask your company to pay for it and give you time off to revise for example, after all they are likely to gain from your training and interest. If your company does invest in you in this way then give them (mucho) credit for it when you get ...


1

As was already stated - you're not alone. Since you do not have a lot of time - you must have focus. Define what exactly are you trying to accomplish and make sure that you're not wasting time trying to learn "everything". I've found that choosing a project when learning a new technology or programming languages helps maintain focus and motivation so ...


1

You can also use a CRM (Customer Relationship Management) tool with your email. You can use many of them as plugins with your email client - gmail probably has the most options. Some like Capsule CRM have a nice button you click to sync up. You will, however, be committed to use the address book with the CRM.


1

You should sync your google account with your mobile's gmail application After sycing, you can view Name, Email id, Mobile No at your google contacts https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#contacts Then you go select all contacts of that link & click more the click export then select "vCard format " and after successful exporting...import this vCard into ...


1

GTD itself does not classify tasks by Urgency and Importance - that lifehacker article proposes the old urgency/importance matrix as an alternative to GTD. In GTD, urgency and importance are considered when selecting which action to do, but only after considering context, time available, and energy. You only consider it in the moment of deciding, you don't ...


1

Work isn't fun as the game you like to play, and it shouldn't be. People that have absolute fun at work are rare. And it's idea of this era that we should all be happy all the time, doing pleasant jobs, having cool hype projects, working happily ever after. Fun and happy part comes after you finish your job, sometimes in between. You are avoiding what ...


1

First, change your language. You are not lazy; you are unmotivated. There is a world of difference. If you define yourself as "lazy" you're assuming the problem is a character flaw, and that implies that it will be difficult to fix underlying issue. This will lead to further lack of interest in fixing things (You also invite comments like "just * do it", ...



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