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38

Relationships take time. How much time is up to you and your girlfriend. You need to think about where your time goes and what your current priorities are. Maybe you need to discuss having X nights a week to yourself? Also, look for ways you and your girlfriend can spend time together on some of these things. Is she in college too? If so, can you study ...


20

Am I destroying my career? Yes you are... UNLESS you gain knowledge outside your current job you will become quite value-less to other companies. You have to keep yourself current. I worked as a SENIOR software developer for 11 years and when I changed positions I was clueless as to all other technologies and methodologies. I had no idea what Scrum was ...


16

You are trading work-time for her-time. Only you can decide if it's worth it or not. It might be possible to frame or "schedule" your relationship, but it might not work for her (or you two).


15

It is worthwhile weighing up the things that are important to you now, as @JeffO correctly states, and the things that might be more important to you longer term. For example, you may be willing to have a reduced quality of personal time now (eg working 100 hour weeks) if you feel it will help you get to a point (income, promotion, etc) later in life where ...


14

One of the biggest keys to productivity that I've found in my life is setting realistic goals. On Thursday afternoon, when I think of something really cool and beneficial that I'd like to do, it's very easy to say, "Oh yeah, I'll do that on Saturday, I'll dive right in and work away on that for hours, and it's gonna be great!" On Saturday morning, I often ...


13

I was sort of in the same position. I work 7-15 and then I usually go home and work on personal projects or meet friends. But when I got a girlfriend the personal projects didn't get enough time. So I figured that I need to find the time. What I did is meet her about 2-3 times a week. Usually I meet her about 17 o'clock so that I have about 2 hours of ...


13

The short answer: Just efing do it. Force yourself if you must. The long answer: If you are a professional programmer, consult your project manager with this. Tell him that you are having trouble with your productivity and talk to him about helping you divide your work into small tasks, which you will commit on a daily basis. If you are a hobbyist / ...


11

Your approach is quite narrow. You are approaching a NEW situation with the mindset you had in your OLD situation. "I was spending more time for work before i had my girlfriend" Instead ask, "What is being with my girlfriend bringing me in regard to work". See, nothing is one-faceted in life - everything has multiple effects and consequences in different ...


11

I've been a .NET developer for going on 12 years and I'm still as passionate today as I was on day one. If you're stuck witting console apps and don't have much variety in your development work this can be difficult. I think I would probably feel the same as you in this position. The thing that has kept .NET interesting for me is learning all the new ...


10

This is obvious, but sometimes we may need a reminder, of something like: Work is done at work. What is done at work, stays at work. Everything else is not work. So, when you leave work, try to keep the work-related thoughts out of your head and relax; it's now your own personal time. Have a break. Have a ... you know, relax. But when you get back to work, ...


9

It is generally agreed that while 70+ hour weeks can be productive in the short term they actually rapidly lead to a dramatic drop off in productivity, such that you would be better off dropping back down to 45 hours or thereabouts. I know long hours can be enjoyable and some cultures push you hard like this, but are you focusing on time rather than output ...


9

TL;DR Pick 5 books. Shelf the rest. Pick 2 Projects Shelf the rest. Pick one knowledge area until you are skilled enough to be able to answer the majority of questions on SE. Shelf the rest until that moment comes. Steve Jobs famously said (likely paraphrased from elsewhere0 that the most effective people know which projects to set aside. I am ...


9

I suggest two things: (Generalizing on Bloodcounts answer) Use external structures that force or remind you. There are tons of those you can think of: A list of (smaller) tasks and milestones, clearly visible ( It helps to plan 'back from the future': In order to accomplish C on day Z, I need to complete B on day Y, and for that I need to complete A on ...


7

Evernote (http://evernote.com) can do what you're looking for, and more. It's cloud based and platform independent. You can attach an unlimited number (as far as I know) of tags to an item. You can create a tag hierarchy if you want to, although hierarchical retrieval isn't Evernote's strength. It will hold all the data types you mention.


7

You have an advantage in your current position in that you have time to actually research and apply new technologies to what you are doing thanks to the pace in your environment, and you will get paid to do it. I would take as much advantage of that as possible to sharpen your skills.


7

It looks like you have two hours a day commuting on public transportation. That's a golden opportunity to spend time studying. You can start small listening to podcasts, and work your way up to tutorials on a laptop.


6

Identify the important things in your personal life and use all the scheduling and planning techniques you can to make sure they happen. Work with the people in your life and ask them to help you. Maybe you can spend more time with them if they're willing to help you develop a schedule. Otherwise, you'll get caught-up in your work and forget about it or ...


6

I think your first step should be to prioritize those goals. That's a lot to have in your head at one point. The more you are doing at the same time, the more "state" has to stay in your head. Which makes it harder to get moving on it. For example, you are in the middle of at least 20 books. Pick a couple and FINISH them. Then move on to the next book. I am ...


6

Simply bring materials to read and study with you at all times. Also don't forget to bring a pen or pencil with you. I rather enjoy waiting in a queue and what not, because I can focus better on reading. It's an analogous feeling as going to a coffee shop to work. Whenever I expect I would wait for more than 5 minutes, I immediately bring out the material ...


6

Your not alone. I think this describes the typical day for most people. It's hard to find the time to learn new stuff and keep your skills sharp. You need to make more time in your day or use the time you have more effectively. Having little time means you probably won't be able to sit down and read a book for any amount of time so your best option may to ...


6

I am in a similar situation except replace 1 hour at gym with 2-3 hours for family (kids) and 1-2 hour of homework (grad school). Here are the things I found that helped me. The biggest thing that helped me was to force myself to use it at work. This obviously depends on what you do for a job (I'm not a programmer but still work at a computer all day). I ...


6

It may make sense to work on two or three books in parallel, so you can switch between them if you hit a writer's block. However, ten books are probably far too many. I would suggest designating one book as your primary focus and working on this one the majority of your time, and designating one or two others as backups. If you do hit a snag with your ...


6

It sounds to me like you're struggling with creating an environment for reading, not finding time to read. You mention that you struggle reading in bed (naturally) and there's no place for you to read that's neither too loud or too quiet. What you need to do is create a place (whether permanent or temporary) and associate it with where and when you are ...


5

Your question is very open, but I would say that your issues may stem more from a paralyzing fear of failure (or other source of paralysis) than an inability to be organized. I would start my advice with two books that helped me: Getting Things Done by David Allen The Now Habit by Neil Fiore The 2nd one in particular discusses some of the psychology ...


5

Emacs org-mode is a very powerful solution which lets you (among other things) ... (see features overview on org-mode homepage) features and advantages for your application store text or code snippets work directly with source code do complex filtering and searching (regexp, etc.) in "agendas" assign multiple tags to each of the text snippets organize ...


5

I use GTD, so I have a "Someday / Maybe" list Take a look at your projects list, so put all your coding projects, cashflow ideas, and personal improvement goals on one list. Now as you look at that list, decide what you want to put on hold, and move them to your Someday/Maybe list. The rest stay on your Projects list. These will be your focus. A ...


5

The thing I have realized is my levels of rest and sleep depend on too many things other than just the sleeping time. Here are my experiences. You have to ask yourself, what kind of tiredness do I have to take care of? Physical Mental Emotional At times when you are having a great time with friends, family on an event or party or day/ night out ...


5

This might sound obvious, but it really is the answer to your question, so here we go. Do something else. I've come to understand that a lot of the things we try to do, a lot of our inspirations, pet side projects, etc., are less important than they feel when we get the idea. Work on it for a while. If you hit a wall or aren't motivated anymore, take a ...


5

Getting Things Done actually helps with this. You don't have to use the whole process to take advantage of time fragments though. The free Toodledo site and app support enough of the concepts to help. The idea is to break tasks into smaller ones and to include context. That way you can pick a relevant micro-task based on where you are and what is ...


5

I had a similar problem, and I decided the Fall of 2013 would be the semester of "No". I said no to everything and even quit a lot of other projects. I found upfront honesty to be key. ie, "I'm no longer going to work on this project because I'm over committed." There were some things I quit that I felt bad about, but over all there is less stress in my ...



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