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Make a choice: Enjoy the benefits of owning a dog, and embrace the responsibilities. Accept the fact that your productivity will drop, not just temporarily, but permanently. Appreciate that the lost productivity doesn't matter, because spending time with your dog is more important to you. Give the dog to someone who actually wants a dog, not just the idea ...


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Because your post doesn't lay out anything you've tried I'm assuming you're just starting to improve this aspect of your work life. I'll make some suggestions that I don't see elsewhere in this thread, and I hope they are helpful. Journal This, IMHO, is the most important habit you can form. I say this because when we are reacting to our work load we don'...


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One of the things that can result in feelings of "burnout" is a lack of balance in your life. If you focus too much energy in one area of life (e.g. intellectual work) and neglect others (e.g. taking care of your health) then that can degrade both your performance and motivation. The solution is to reverse the trend. Think about the areas of life that you'...


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Some ideas: Take a break. Work on something else for a while, and let your brain chew over the task. Chances are you'll have a flash of insight when you come back to it. Ask for help. Perhaps someone else has greater expertise, or can simply approach the task in a different way? Explain the problem to a rubber duck (or your dog, spouse, blog etc.). ...


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I agree with Jan Doggen's comment that it's probably time for a medical checkup. Then, I'd suggest you speak with a mental health professional. What you are describing could be a number of physical or mental conditions that can easily wreck your work and personal life. Bear in mind that this will be a journey and not a destination. You can't really expect a ...


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You put ideas and new work in your inbox asap. You empty your inbox daily (but more often is better) and convert all the inbox items into next actions or put them in whatever system you need them to be (someday list, tickler system, reference system, trashcan, ...). You review your whole system weekly in the weekly review. This includes looking at all your ...


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I remove my answer because i misread the question Privacy was the reason why i quit using RescueTime too (notice "used" as past indicator I used RescueTime for a long while It includes windows and linux but i am not sure about OSX www.rescuetime.com It provides very indetail insight into the data (for example how many seconds you where on which website)...


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I was a sleep therapist once and he suggested that I find someone I didn't like (in my case at the time it was my brother haha) and tell them I was going to give them money ($10, $20, whatever) if I'm not awake by X o'clock. They will be motivated to check if you're awake by that time and you'll be motivated not to give them your money. Also seconding what ...


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It seems natural to me to look at any day-relevant items on my lists at the beginning of the day. These include deadlines, start dates, and appointments. Knowing what contexts (eg, locations) you will have available to you on a day may occasion a review of tasks specific to the contexts. I usually mark the tasks that seem to me particularly worth keeping on ...


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If you have a new idea, or are given new work to do, that goes in your inbox to be processed in due course, regardless of when it happens. This is what GTDers mean by "Ubiquitous capture". The weekly review is not caused by any input; it's just setting aside a moment to go over everything, This is mainly to be sure that you haven't missed anything, but also ...



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