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10

You may lose 5-10 minutes of your life by being early. But by being late, you may lose 30 minutes (by missing the bus, doctor calling someone else, and so on). If someone is waiting for you, you'll lose a lot of respect which will take far more than 5-10 minutes of your life to earn back. My father would refuse to do business with people who show up to ...


7

When you have no reason to, no purpose. Measuring anything is a waste of time if you have not determined beforehand why you want to measure what. Usually you determine the why first (why would you want to measure 'time', instead of 'time spent on X'), then you decide what is useful to measure, then you decide which tools you use (you don't use an ordinary ...


7

There are lots of good answers already. Let me add one more aspect. There is an asymmetry between being early and being late. If you are early, you know that you are early. You can plan accordingly. If you are 30 minutes early, you can bring a book. If you are 5 minutes early, you can do a quick phone call, read or write a few emails or messages. When you ...


6

I used to have a problem with chronic lateness, and I whilst I was well aware of the problems that my lateness caused me, I often overlooked the impact of my lateness on others. This is partly because many of these problems were experienced by people before I even arrived, and when I did finally turn up, I was often in such a rush that I didn’t notice other ...


5

I find airplane travel to be one of my most productive times because of the lack of distractions. The catch is that it is only productive for a specific type of work and requires advance planning. Things to think about: Will you have internet connectivity on the plane? (even if you will, I recommend downloading what you need in advance) What can you do ...


5

-Subtract the amount of hours you sleep. let's say you sleep 7 hours a day. -If you are working on a traditional 9-5 job. Substract that 8 hours and you take out 2 hours for transport, eating, etc You got 7 hours left. but this is a pretty optimistic estimate


4

To know how much time you have in a day you should first answer this question : How much time can you stay fully focused per day ? Fully focused means doing a task without any interruption Everybody is different on that but there is a way you can measure it. To know what your focus capacity is, use a time tracking software like Toggl. http://toggl.com ...


4

Ktimetracker Although I have no experience with this particular software, it might suit your needs. It's from KDE, so if you are using other Desktop Environment it might install a lot of dependencies. ktimetracker


2

I use Hamster. It meets all your requirements. I have mine set to track to the nearest 1/10 of an hour (6 minutes). If there is inactivity for that period, it stops tracking but also every 6 minutes a 5-second tiny window pops up in the corner to remind you as to which project you're currently tracking against...to included you're currently not tracking ...


2

Google calender does this, just set the reminder timer to head of the events. There is a desktop-ish version of Google calender you can download for free.


2

You should aim to be slightly early because it acts as a form of contingency. Years ago I would calculate the exact time I needed to leave the house, in order to pick my daughters up from school. Then I would adjust the alarm on my phone so it reminded me to leave the house just at the moment which would ensure I reached the school just in time, and did not ...


1

arbtt seems to match your requirements. Configurable rules sort applications into tags, based on the active window but background ones can also be taken into account The docs show how to configure an idle timer. Hopefully this tracks both keyboard and mouse activity. Generates nice graphs with arbtt-graph (demo here) See also ulogme (screenshots here), ...


1

Put a rubber band around your wrist. For each minute you go beyond your set limit, give yourself a good snap with the rubber band.


1

From a programmer's point of view, I'd also go with: Bring a pen and a notebook. This helps when there is not enough space to use a laptop / you've run out of battery. Related: If working on the plane itself has many distractions, perhaps taking a rest on the plane, and working in the airport is more productive between flights (internet, power, more ...


1

I try to do that on long flight. To use the time and to keep me awake. The latter so I can sleep only when it is adequate for me to try and adjust myself to the new time zone. Most of what I would have to say has been mentioned. I would add: Take breaks if it is a long flight and you have a goal similar to the one I stated (adjust to time zone). Make it ...


1

Syed Balkhi of the Young Entrepreneur Council wrote this article on the 6 Powerful Actions for Improving Your Productivity. I'll quote what he said on his 1st recommended action which is "Tracking." How much of your time is spent on emails or on the phone versus doing your most important work? If you don't have a clear picture of how your days are ...


1

Probably the single best reason is so you are respectful. Being late for a meeting or an appointment is disrespectful to all others involved. While it is wrong for others to do it (Doctor appointments etc..) you don't want to stoop to their level. Always being respectful to others will only make you a better person and others will see it.


1

I have been through Evernote, Stickers, Remember the Milk and I didn't like any of them. I use my computer AND my phone to organise my things. Evernote cannot store as many notes as you might think. At some point it pops up and requests money. I cannot connect Stickers to my phone. Remember the Milk can only synchronise once every 12 hours or so. I use ...


1

I've personally used Stickies for years and I think that, for a "Post-It" like application for Windows with the ability to set reminders, you'll be hard pressed to find better. Doesn't synchronize with any online service, though.


1

You can also use the Sunrise app. It syncs all of your Google Calendars + reminders + Evernote and a lot more. You can set reminders before the events happen as well.


1

My understanding is that knowledge work (much of what you do) is productive only when "flow" is achieved ... which means that you are completely absorbed and your brain is fully downloaded with everything you need to do that job. This can take a half hour with a task like programming, so losing flow is extremely costly. I really like the research that Tom ...



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