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12

GTD is a productivity framework. It's not a fundamentalist ideology. If a GTD precept interferes with you Getting Things Done here and now, disregard the precept. When I'm in a "flow" state and something X pops up that could be done in two minutes but would interrupt my flow, I'll happily disregard it. If taking a note would disrupt my flow, I won't take a ...


11

While some of these are well respected books, reading them will not change anything you do...practicing the techniques described in them will. So don't read them all at once. Read one, extract the techniques that work for you. Practice them and embed them in your daily routines and mental toolset. Then go on to the next book if needed. And sometimes a ...


11

To apply any rule effectively (and to know when to ignore it) it is wise to understand the purpose of the rule. So, why the two-minute rule? According to David Allen, "If you determine an action can be done in two minutes, you actually should do it right then because it’ll take longer to organize it and review it than it would be to actually finish it the ...


9

The answer is simple and straightforward: Minimalism. Don't fall into the trap (that I already did one thousand times) of GTD strategies and Time management Gods/Gurus (or whatever they call themselves) which aim to sell something "complicated" in order to present themselves as more clever and smart than us. Through my research crusade all these years to ...


8

It looks like you may have 3 issues that are important for Kanban - You have a high WIP issue. You may have a prioritization challenge. You also have a 'sizing' problem. Let me elaborate on each - High WIP. Clearly, you have a number of well-defined and not so well-defined projects that you have to do. The projects seem sizeable enough to manage on ...


7

Been there, and after twenty years, I am still there actually :) A bit of Zen wisdom might lighten the pain: most knowledge that are not technical comes from within. If one can understand and accept that, one gets less stressed about the number of books that are waiting to be read. Remember that books are books, and some tips that make sense, are not ...


7

Most of the time pen and paper works best because its fast. If I am brainstorming or taking notes at a meeting I will always work with pen and paper and then translate the notes into my digital system. Pen and paper however are not always practical to carry. I am very comfortable with texting so I usually try to enter into a note taking app that I wrote for ...


7

GTD is based on everything coming into your inbox and being processed from there. You can virtually use any tool that you want to implement the GTD methods. The Kanban Tool seems to just be a Kanban Board that is shared amongst peers. I've never used it, but it seems to be based on the physical construction of a workflow and does not rely on inter-related ...


6

It sounds as though you're calling things "to do lists" when they are really action items about a project-- the kinds of detail you don't need until you're ready to turn to that project. Have you explored David Allen's Getting Things Done approach? You keep only the next action required for each project at the top level, and organize by category e.g. calls ...


4

If you are looking for a quick, simple solution you can use a simple text file with markdown markup (that kind of markup you use e.g. here on stackexchange, reddit, ...) and open it in a text editor which can do code folding. In TextWrangler (free and awesome) this will look like this: Maybe not a solution with many features, but it will be included in ...


4

Indeed, it is very important to be able to note ideas and tasks quickly and then directly return back to the thing you are working on to avoid breaking flow and concentration. The crucial thing with all kinds of these notes is: you have to review them later (on short term!). Thus, it makes sense to reduce the "inboxes" for such notes to a minimum and make ...


4

I use a binder along the 43 folders concept from GTD: 31 sections for the next 31 days, 12 sections for the next months. Every piece of paper that requires action on a particular day gets put into the binder in the corresponding section (daily if less than one month out, monthly if more). Every morning, I process whatever awaits me for this day and shift ...


4

K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple Stupid) At the start of each day, I write a simple list with bullet circles in front of each item. I've found that 6 tasks per day is about the limit of what I can accomplish. For tasks that have a date to be done by or on, I put the date in the margin to the left of the bullet. Started tasks get one slash. Complete tasks get the ...


4

Is there a way to have one application for everything (including pomodoro)? There is no need to have an app for creating a todo list and pomodoros, since these are two different things: one is a tool to remember things, the other is a tool to stay focused and take brakes. Think what to do vs. how or in which pacing to do. In case you need to use ...


4

This is a rule to use while processing. For example, you are cleaning your inbox or going throw a pile of papers. In this case it might be better to solve this mini-task and continue. But when you are writing a paper you are in the "doing mode". In most intelectual tasks loosing your focus will break your concentration so I advise not to do it. In fact it ...


3

I always liked the good old fashion paper desk calendar. Any style will work really but I prefer the larger ones that sit on the surface of your desk showing a whole month at a time. You can quickly set firm or arbitrary task deadlines and reminders and balance your workload and meetings visually. Furthermore it is easy to reference, and it is always there ...


3

TL;DR: Don't use Evernote as a to-do tool. I find Evernote to be a great place for reference material, but not for actual to-do lists that frequently change. For that, I use a mix of two other tools instead: workflowy.com is the most fantastic outliner I've ever seen. It's minimalistic in appearance but packs the perfect amount of functionality in a very ...


3

How do you remember to work off your todo list? . I have a problem with working off my todo list (which is a canonical GTD next-action list in digital form.) The words in bold are the problem source. The problem is that the TODO list is in a file in computer. So it will be before your eyes only when you actually open it. Once you minimize or ...


3

Please consider Checkvist. It is a hierarchical outliner from one side, and a rich task manager from another. Strongly focused on working from keyboard. I'm from the development team, and I really think it will suit your needs.


3

http://workflowy.com looks like what you are after. Simple list of list of list of stuff :) UPDATE: Why the downvote? Workflowy ticks all the boxes OP requested. (And I am not affiliated to them).


3

The Pros: You are saving the environment. +1 for that. You do not have to maintain a large number of files. This makes sorting and searching easy. Most of the note-taking apps have built in search features so you can search for titles or specific words in the content. This is a major productivity boost as it saves time and effort. You can sync your ...


3

The one thing that I kept seeing over and over again was application. This application, that application, application application. I'm becoming afraid that I miss something, cause maybe a task is written in one list but not the other. I am a programmer. I make applications but personally all of what I want to do is written in an old-fashioned ...


3

https://www.subtask.com/ looks like what you are looking for. http://mindontrack.com/ too. Basically I googled "mindmap task management", you may find more alternatives in the results.


3

Much of personal productivity methodology seems to be based on reducing the strain on the brain of deciding what to do. No, it isn't. Methodologies you refer to are about making decisions once and at a right time, instead of dragging them along, and about externalizing memory (since our brain seems to be more fit for recognition rather than ...


3

I think storing the complete list of tasks outside of the brain is part of many time-management systems, including GTD you've mentioned. I don't remember GTD advocating detailed and rigid planning though - I think it is more about easily finding the next actionable item. For the methods of prioritizing the tasks for your day/session you could check Mark ...


3

I have a different perspective on this issue. Here is the "rule" as you state it: if you recall something you need to do, and that something takes less than 2 minutes to do, then drop whatever you are doing right now and do it. If you "recall" it, that means it had already occurred to you and you chose to delay it - possibly because it took more than 2 ...


3

If you have something that you need to do on a specific date at a specific time, put it in your calendar. (Doctor's appointments, daily standups, picking someone up.) If you need to do something on a particular date, but you don't care about the specific time, either block a specific time slot if the activity will take some time - then this effectively ...


2

I often have tasks that can't simply be "completed" as well, for example "Learn this software framework" or "Make archery a hobby". In my view, these are really projects, and not tasks. So, while you can complete a project, you can't just "do the project". You have to break it down into elements which you can do. I have a few suggestions to use to help ...


2

As Dave said, most organisers will let you list unscheduled tasks so that shouldn't be an issue. The best solution for you though is to learn how to create the required subtasks in each task you have listed as uncompletable. For example, you state that breaking down "work on x song" is not possible. Don't treat it as needing to write one verse, but instead ...


2

The key to not breaking your flow is being able to jot the to-do as quickly/easily as possible. This involves a two-step capture (in the spirit of Getting Things Done). Keep capture options at the ready anywhere you are normally -- a post-it note on the back of your phone, a post-it on your desk, etc. When you have an idea, write the absolute least you can ...



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