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17

Maybe this web app is somewhat near what you're looking for: http://typing.io/ Also take a look at this one: http://wpm-test.com/programming-typing-test/


10

I simply wouldn't worry about being able to touch type the symbols for programming. I can type around 100wpm when I'm writing an essay, but would never hit that programming. You just don't write code in the same way you write an essay. Especially using C# in visual studio where you have intellisense writing a lot of the code for you. If you want to look ...


9

Type with ten fingers if you don't already do so, avoid hunting-and-pecking... Dvorak will decrease the finger distance, the switch can take from some weeks to some months. Keyboard training will help you practice to type common English words without making you wonder what to type. This allows you to practice at a higher wpm than when you would type things ...


9

There have been a lot of studies on handwriting and memory. The Wall Street Journal article How Handwriting Trains the Brain talks about one such study that shows that children learn to recognize letter shapes faster and more accurately if they write them out rather than typing them. Writing by hand also helps adults who are learning a graphically ...


8

My answer, although a guess, is NO. You are already typing at remarkable speed (and you should be teaching us how to do it*). I don't know how much faster is possible but I would wonder how much time learning a new keyboard would ever be repaid in increased productivity. I personally get concerned with getting too familiar with non-standard settings, ...


7

At 60 wpm it's easy to assume you have already memorized the keyboard and don't need to look at it. You're looking for a software that can be used to train your fingers to hit only the closest keys. Each color corresponds to a finger. The circles shows the standard position for left and right hands. It might look a bit complicated to get used to this but ...


7

I bought "Typequick" and set aside a practice time everyday for about a month. Pianists and other musicians do specific drills every day, even when they practice whole pieces or perform every day. I randomly fetch it out again, but its model no longer helps me improve my speed, or more importantly accuracy. [I've yet to find a tool for 'advanced' learners.] ...


7

I have been faced with the same problem. I don't deliberately train a lot outside work. Sometimes at night and in the weekend but always with some aim besides the training. If I am replying to some emails or chating leisurely I take the extra time to touch-type them, but that's it. I don't spend a great deal of time working through exercises. What I started ...


7

This website called TypeRacer is one I've used to significantly increase my typing speed. It basically tracks your typing speed in a game format but requires you to type perfectly to advance. Rather, not my speed, but my accuracy. Once you get around 80-100wpm you start needing to be precise and perfect, the first time, to avoid all mistakes. It's hard to ...


5

Whenever I typed with QWERTY, I used to type 40-65 WPM. 70 MAX. Now, I switched to DVORAK, I type anywhere between 70-120 WPM - depending on the complexity of what I'm typing. Someone said that the "social repercussions of typing in DVORAK far outweigh blah blah blah"...I just gotta call HogWash on that. Whenever you switch to DVORAK, your QWERTY ...


5

With such a typing speed, what is now your bottleneck? Do you find yourself waiting on your fingers to progress in your work? If yes, keep improving. If no, start researching on how to improve your other points.


4

On most windows machines these days there's a key that produces the same effect as a right-click of the mouse. That's a hardware thing, so it should work in pretty much all programs. It is usually between the Alt and Ctrl keys to the right of the space bar, often has an icon that looks kind of like a dropdown menu. Non-QWERTY keyboards, YMMV. To do the ...


4

Without switching to a different keyboard layout, I've found it useful simply just to get in practice with visual feedback. This may or may not seem a bit corny, but the game-styled interface provided by Typeracer has been useful for me to check where my speed is, and to perform typing exercises through typing passages.


4

You can use Keyboarding tutorial and typing test and add your own text. It would be interesting for example, to see how typing speeds differ between languages as different, or unusual syntax starts to take effect. In general I think that touch typing is a vital skill for anybody using a computer at all and well worth the time. My personal way forward (I ...


4

This question is similar to another I answered about DVORAK so I'll link to my response there and add some more information. From my experience DVORAK is not about speed as much as it is about comfort especially if you already type with QWERTY and if you need to switch between the two layouts often. My speed on DVORAK is only slightly faster than it was on ...


3

I learned to touch type long enough ago that the device I learned on had a lever you pushed with the left hand to accomplish a carriage return. (i.e. manual typewriter). The finger map layout I learned and still use today (at 110wpm on a good day) is your second image. It isn't a new development. I don't believe there are any ergonomic benefits to EDX. ...


3

I just did a little experiment and typed the following without looking at the keyboard: a=a++ - used my middle finger for the = and + a[0] - used my third finger for the [ and 0. used my fourth finger for the ] a?a:b - used my fourth finger for the ? and my pinky for the : There's no right or wrong to this. It's just what I do. And I do touch type ...


3

The proper way, which Pitman and all the other major methods use, is to learn your home keys: For your left hand, pinkie finger to index finger should sit on A, S, D and F For your right hand, similarly for ;, L, K, J Thumbs should both sit on the space bar You should be able to feel the little ridge on the F and J keys - these tell you when you are back ...


3

In my experience, it is unneccesary to use typing trainers. You just need to understand how the 10 finger system works (see also Rory Alsops answer), and again and again remind you of the correct way to type during your normal work. It'll take some months, but will be worth it and takes not much additional time or effort. It also helps to switch to an ...


3

Thanks to Syd Kerckhove's answer (which also contains very useful extensions), I found Firemacs (http://www.mew.org/~kazu/proj/firemacs/en/) , a Firefox Plugin which directly creates Emacs-like shortcuts in Firefox.


3

No, it is not. I've been typing Dvorak since 2000, and before switching I typed 70-90 wpm. Now I type 70-90 wpm. Switching was extraordinarily frustrating at first, and didn't bring any tangible benefits other than geek cred. My QWERTY typing suffered immediately, and while I can switch back and forth now and get up to reasonable speeds after 10 minutes, I ...


2

The argument for a mechanical keyboard is that you don't have to press as hard and get more tactical feedback. Tactical feedback matters (my typing speed is lower on the iPad). I haven't tried a mechanical keyboard, but it stands to reason having to press slightly less distance can speed things up. Especially since you already have a fast typing speed. ...


2

First, is your touch-typing getting better at all? I agree that it's not optimal to have to switch between systems, but if that's what you have to do, that's what you have to do. It's possible that despite the switches to hunt-and-peck, your weekend/evening touch-typing practice will be enough to eventually get your touch-typing speed up to 300cpm, at ...


2

If it is absolutely necessary to type faster at work and you for sure wants to learn touch typing faster, I think the best thing to do is to ask for some days off. Let us say a week or so. Well, this may seem like you are losing money or something, but think about it, touch typing is a crucial investment in your life. So for that one week, vigorously ...


2

Just do a lot of programming and you'll pick it up over time. I never learned how to touch type traditionally, it was just lots of time in front of my computer programming and gaming, because of the latter my left hand sits on WASD when idling :D A lot of people are shocked at how fast I can type and I never did any formal keyboard training, just lots of ...


2

I think partially the answer depends on what you type. If you just type general texts, any keyboard training program will probably do ok. On the other hand if you do specialized typing, such as software programming, your needs are quite different and rotate a lot more around brackets, braces, numbers and weird punctuation signs. I don't think too many ...


2

Wikipedia indicates average touch typing speed is about 60 WPM (or 300 CPM given the (un-cited) 5:1 conversion factor). You claim to already be able to type significantly faster than this using hunt-and-peck, which frankly is a little hard to believe. But assuming it's true: that you're able to type that fast with two fingers while looking at board, then I ...


2

Swype or similar (such as TouchKey, which I prefer over Swype) can improve your speed by 300-400% but you will have to go through the learning phase where you will be slower at first. I didn't think it would help me but I stuck with it as a friend said it would help, and I am now so much faster. I can move my thumb or finger almost as fast as I can think ...


2

I had a similar question that I posted on superuser. I finally figured out a way to disable the use of the 'wrong' Shift key using Xmodmap for Linux. I've been trying it out for a few days and it will definitely enforce using the proper hands to Shift. Unfortunately, it seems impossible to use this method to force the same with Ctrl.


2

I can suggest two tips: Use all ten fingers. Use both hands when possible. E.g. to type :, press Shift with your left hand and ; with your right hand. The same goes for Alt, Ctrl, etc.



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