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8

My answer, although a guess, is NO. You are already typing at remarkable speed (and you should be teaching us how to do it*). I don't know how much faster is possible but I would wonder how much time learning a new keyboard would ever be repaid in increased productivity. I personally get concerned with getting too familiar with non-standard settings, ...


6

This website called TypeRacer is one I've used to significantly increase my typing speed. It basically tracks your typing speed in a game format but requires you to type perfectly to advance. Rather, not my speed, but my accuracy. Once you get around 80-100wpm you start needing to be precise and perfect, the first time, to avoid all mistakes. It's hard to ...


4

This question is similar to another I answered about DVORAK so I'll link to my response there and add some more information. From my experience DVORAK is not about speed as much as it is about comfort especially if you already type with QWERTY and if you need to switch between the two layouts often. My speed on DVORAK is only slightly faster than it was on ...


3

Thanks to Syd Kerckhove's answer (which also contains very useful extensions), I found Firemacs (http://www.mew.org/~kazu/proj/firemacs/en/) , a Firefox Plugin which directly creates Emacs-like shortcuts in Firefox.


3

I learned to touch type long enough ago that the device I learned on had a lever you pushed with the left hand to accomplish a carriage return. (i.e. manual typewriter). The finger map layout I learned and still use today (at 110wpm on a good day) is your second image. It isn't a new development. I don't believe there are any ergonomic benefits to EDX. ...


3

No, it is not. I've been typing Dvorak since 2000, and before switching I typed 70-90 wpm. Now I type 70-90 wpm. Switching was extraordinarily frustrating at first, and didn't bring any tangible benefits other than geek cred. My QWERTY typing suffered immediately, and while I can switch back and forth now and get up to reasonable speeds after 10 minutes, I ...


3

In my experience, it is unneccesary to use typing trainers. You just need to understand how the 10 finger system works (see also Rory Alsops answer), and again and again remind you of the correct way to type during your normal work. It'll take some months, but will be worth it and takes not much additional time or effort. It also helps to switch to an ...


3

The proper way, which Pitman and all the other major methods use, is to learn your home keys: For your left hand, pinkie finger to index finger should sit on A, S, D and F For your right hand, similarly for ;, L, K, J Thumbs should both sit on the space bar You should be able to feel the little ridge on the F and J keys - these tell you when you are back ...


2

I had a similar question that I posted on superuser. I finally figured out a way to disable the use of the 'wrong' Shift key using Xmodmap for Linux. I've been trying it out for a few days and it will definitely enforce using the proper hands to Shift. Unfortunately, it seems impossible to use this method to force the same with Ctrl.


2

Swype or similar (such as TouchKey, which I prefer over Swype) can improve your speed by 300-400% but you will have to go through the learning phase where you will be slower at first. I didn't think it would help me but I stuck with it as a friend said it would help, and I am now so much faster. I can move my thumb or finger almost as fast as I can think ...


1

You may find it easier to use the Right Shift, as it's wider. If you're having trouble holding the shift while typing; activate Sticky Keys. I don't know if you know how to do this, so just in case: hit Shift five times to get up Sticky Key options. And be sure to make sure that the setting Turn off Sticky Keys when two keys are pressed at once is ...


1

I built this thing for myself in Python, and I like it better than anything I found online: from time import time def training(): test = 'ap, a[, a], a}, a{' # modify to whatever you want to practice print "Enter : {}".format(test) start = time() result = raw_input("Enter : ") if test == result: print 'Your time : ...


1

Typing.io is really nice. It's designed specifically for programmers The paid version lets you upload and type any code you want. I haven't tried the paid version yet, but I think I might. Seems like a great way to get familiar with an open source project. If you're going to put time into reading and typing some text, wouldn't it be cool if that text ...


1

While I appreciate your goal (most gain for best efficient use of time), I have found that the best tool is a combination of several tools, directed by a consciousness (metacognition) of how you're learning. You come to realize there are several aspects of typing: consistent speed, bursty typing, initial typing (vs being in the middle of a long paragraph), ...



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