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6

Before you take a break, write down the next action to be done after you get back to work. This is important for two reasons - 1) you won't waste time trying to recall what you were working on 2) getting back to work will be much easier. Large portion of why we procrastinate is because the task is vague and we're afraid of it. Actionable tasks help with ...


5

I am not a natural born programmer, but it is something that I have taught myself to tolerate and even enjoy at times. Here are a few things that helped me: 1.) find out which part of programming most interests you. "Programming" is such a large topic. Do you enjoy working with databases, creating web services? Then the "back-end" might be more your cup ...


4

When you wake up, do not do anything that is exciting or disturbs sleep: no eating, no Internet browsing. Reading might be OK if it is relaxing, so no super-exciting books or (study) books that require heavy attention. Set an alarm and get out of bed. No compromises. Go to a doctor to determine if you really have Shift Work Sleep Disorder. Self-diagnosing ...


3

By the sounds of it you sounds like you know what you want but you don't how how to reach your goal, where to start, or who to go to. Let me tell you my story, and see how we relate. I graduated with a degree in Business Economics and decided I wanted to work with computers. I got a job in an IT support company and after a couple of months I decided ...


3

I dislike that part of your speech when you said "I feel like I'm too stupid to learn". NO YOU ARE NOT STUPID ! Please,Try be kind with yourself and avoid those Self-deprecating thoughts. You probably are not mediocre. Check this slides from a presentation about the impostor syndrome. And see this video, that's helps me a lot . Not knowing about a specific ...


3

I think it's more effective to apply it through an external system. This is one of the points of agile software development methods. Break down the big task into smaller task and focus on that and when you expect that to be finished. This can be applied to most parts of life, and with some discipline, you can hold yourself accountable. Set small goals with ...


3

While I haven't done it during a work day, I do notice a big difference when living in a bit more sedative way and when exercising (jogging) regularly. The latter makes me much more energetic in general, and more calm. I usually run about 2-3 times a week, for anything between 30 minutes to 2 hours per session. On average, I would say a bit over 1 hour per ...


3

I would recommend that you look at "The Power of Habit" by Charles Duhigg if you are able. It contains advice on how habits and willpower work and how to make or break habits. Some tips from the book include: Marking a piece of paper every time you have the urge to act out a bad habit (if you have more than one you could use different symbols for each ...


3

There are two ways how I make myself get back to work after a small break I know exactly what I am going to do during the break and after I have accomplished wanted I get back straight to work without excuses. If I do not know exactly what I am doing during the break I set a timer on my phone. And go back to work after it has set off. I found it useful ...


3

What do you do during your breaks? If you surf around or check facebook/reddit, you'll be tempted to continue longer than you ought to. If you take a walk outside, you'll probably not do it for to long, and if you do, it's a more helpful break. Good breaks: Walks outside, walks inside, coffee break with collegues, eating a snack.


3

I think I used to suffer from this too. The people who told you work out in the morning makes you feel energetic were right but not completely. They didn't really give you the real reason behind it. As a programmer and entrepreneur myself I will tell you, Morning routines (not the same thing as workout, hold on a second) puts you into your zone. Why have a ...


2

I read this from a book (Cal Newport - Straight A student) Write your commitments in a book and if you do not do them when you are supposed to, you need to give a reason why you haven't done it. If it is a good reason, you can rationalize it, but if not you will have to face yourself with writing down a lame reason. Might help kick you into action. ...


2

I apply the following advice to myself and it's working: Always have time for the 'nothing box' e.g. time where you do absolutely nothing. Technically speaking you unwind and rgroup Learn to set better targets by analyzing data. It's normal to over or under estimate one's ability to meet targets. Timely progress reviews gives one insight whether we are ...


2

I would separate "working hard" and "working long hours", as those are often not directly related. For me, working hard means to work with full effort most of the time, trying to accomplish as much as possible in a given amount of time. Working long hours, however, might mean to simply work for a long time, but not necessarily trying to accomplish as much ...


2

This is a brilliant question and one that nearly everyone puts up to one at one stage of life or the other. It may appear that that your work needs to have a higher purpose than what it currently serves. You mention that it's generating acceptable income for you to sustain but you lose the energy (read motivation) occasionally. The cue that you mention is ...


2

You're getting something for doing nothing. Right now, you have no reason to change what you're doing: nothing. You'll change: if you want to, or if you're forced to. Neither method is pain-free. You've allowed your work ethic (whatever it was before the welfare kicked in) to atrophy. Getting it back, even if you want to, will take a lot of effort. ...


2

Stop doing things that you don't want to be doing. If you don't love your work to the fullest, you'll work to survive and keep doing what you don't like to do. That makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. If you're good enough (especially in IT), you'll get a great job with great pay anyway. Having said that, I do think you could learn more from a current ...


2

It's difficult to assess your situation solely from your post, but it sounds like you are overworked. It may be the result of the stress and extra 'work' from everything that happend last year. I'd suggest you first talk to your girlfriend and family. Explain them your problem and tell them that you'll be scheduling time for yourself for the next 2-3 ...


2

Programing can be fun. Especially if you like Math and Languages - you are likely the type of person who can enjoy programming. But it can be very frustrating at times as well. The most important in making the new activity likeable is to achieve the so called Flow state - when tasks that you perform are hard enough to be interesting, but easy enough to be ...


2

When it comes to programming we're on the same page, I am somewhat a starter in programming and often times I find myself feelings stupid too, thinking how on earth did people manage to learn it. I may not be an expert yet So my advice won't be technical but an advice that will keep you going. Don't give up. As Anthony Liccione said "Don't give up because ...


2

As a passionate programmer I suggest for you to look at the amazing things that you can do with programming: Computer will folow your words, you are his master. The math is language of nature, but programming is language of the machine. If you start a company you only need a computer witch is like free ;) The programming tutorials are the bigest and all ...


1

I think the thing about programming that makes life hell is that it take up a lot of time! It need focus to do well at it! And it also comes with all kinds of challenges and I think that is what most of the programmers love. I think programming sucks as a job! It is much better if you take it as a hobby! It sucks because it takes a lot of focus and time! ...


1

Why do you program if you don't like to program? Do you work with programming? If so, how did you end up with such a job? Either way, I think it's good to understand the nature of programming. When you're doing something familiar, you're working very fast, and when doing something new, you'll spend a lot of time. This means that you'll spend a lot of time, ...


1

Work can be pleasant, and most jobs have some aspect that is pleasant. However, we all work in order to get paid, so what we do needs to produce enough value for someone to pay us. And that usually means that we also need to do something that is less pleasant. For instance, you may love coding, and if you could get a job where all you did was code, you ...


1

It can be pleasant, and it is, for many people. Unfortunately, it is not for many more. But that is not the failure of a specific job. It is hard to find the job that is pleasant specifically for you . It will, likely, be a combination of your talents and passion. A good reading on this topic is a book The Element by Sir Ken Robinson (I recommend reading it ...


1

The fact that you've realised competition can be a destructive force is a very good starting point. I agree that you should try to be the best version of yourself and improve continuously, but trying to be better than the ones next to you for the sake of it, is outright absurd. Your goal should be to maximise happiness, not to sacrifice your joy to try ...


1

Everyone in the world is selfish. If they give you an inspiring lecture, it is because they need something from you. Similarly you need something from them like money, reputation, promotion, connections, experience etc.. Do your work well and get these rewards from them. The whole world works in a give and take manner. My personal opinion about the ...


1

I won't directly answer your question, but this may be helpful, and it's too much for a comment. What you describe is a standard "daily stand-up meeting". This is a canonical component of the Scrum software development framework, but it also makes sense in other contexts. Typically, such a "daily scrum" has three agenda points for each participant: What ...


1

To be honest, this is too big a topic to tackle here (and the depression part may actually be off topic) but I do have a few things for you to consider: You completed your graduation. Not everyone can do that. So, start focusing on your qualities and not just your weaknesses. Grades are not the only thing that determines whether you get a job or not. ...



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