Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

About your skills You probably are not mediocre. Check this slides from a presentation about the impostor syndrome. Not knowing about a specific technology or methodology is not deadly by itself. You could alway learn about the new shiny buzzword when you start feeling less comfortable with your current job. Also, if you pick something that interest you ...


1

Yes, you are destroying your career. I think you have two options: 1- See if you can advance within your company OUT of software development and into the business side of things. Your knowledge of the software will be an asset. And your lack of depth won't hurt you since you won't need it anymore. A lot of advanced developers end up doing that anyway when ...


1

Will it keep you happy? You might want to consider doing a degree or other higher-level course to keep you learning. Ask your company to pay for it and give you time off to revise for example, after all they are likely to gain from your training and interest. If your company does invest in you in this way then give them (mucho) credit for it when you get ...


2

If you want to stay at the top of your career you will need to work hard, take courses and learn the latest and greatest technologies. If you are fairly gifted and are willing to sacrifice a lot of time and effort and if you are lucky you will be promoted to management. On the other hand if you like a decent wage and would like to balance that with a ...


3

Yes, you are destroying your career and you will struggle when the time comes to find a new software engineering position. In my experience, positions at the more interesting companies (above average salary and working conditions) are interesting in seeing your GitHub account to gauge your skills as a coder as well and demonstrating your enthusiasm in ...


0

The suggestion from @TK-421 to get some training in DiSC is a good one to help you communicate more effectively with your colleagues. What to communicate will be clearer to you with some training in assertiveness. Your colleague can't waste your time without your tacit permission. Assertiveness training will help you to take control. The same training will ...


3

You can improve your skills AND keep your job. You have spare time to learn - use it! Read up agile methodologies. Write unit tests. Introduce bug database. Etc. Read up Joel Spolsky advice: 12 Steps to Better Code and Getting Things Done When You're Only a Grunt and more.


5

Your problem is "good colleagues", they're the ones that keep you at the level you are right now… if you want to do something get out of their lengthy lunches, long walks, useless chats. This will make you uncomfortable with your current state, but that’s the idea! As long as you stay with them, you'll be like them, don’t make friends in office just keep ...


3

Use your free time to get certifications in things you're interested in. The goal of certification will drive you and will make sure you're actually thorough. Or change jobs - I quit a very cushy and mostly enjoyable job because I had just been doing the same thing too long. 9 years in my case.


7

You have an advantage in your current position in that you have time to actually research and apply new technologies to what you are doing thanks to the pace in your environment, and you will get paid to do it. I would take as much advantage of that as possible to sharpen your skills.


2

It might help you to take the DISC personality test and see how you and your collegue differ. Once you understand this person's basic personality, it might help for you to change the way you interact with this person. For instance, it might be worth it for you to take some time, no matter how uncomfortable, and talk with this person. Communicate expectations ...


19

Am I destroying my career? Yes you are... UNLESS you gain knowledge outside your current job you will become quite value-less to other companies. You have to keep yourself current. I worked as a SENIOR software developer for 11 years and when I changed positions I was clueless as to all other technologies and methodologies. I had no idea what Scrum was ...


11

I've been a .NET developer for going on 12 years and I'm still as passionate today as I was on day one. If you're stuck witting console apps and don't have much variety in your development work this can be difficult. I think I would probably feel the same as you in this position. The thing that has kept .NET interesting for me is learning all the new ...


1

Your colleague who waste your time each day coming and talking to you more than 45 min on a working day You need to make it clear your busy. There are lots of subtle ways to do this without offending your colleagues. For example when they come in and start chatting pretend you were just on your way out the office. The people who have nothing better to do ...


3

A general answer appropriate to all kinds of jobs is to find activities that improve your working environment, or add quality to your project, or improve your skills. Your project lead or manager should be able to give you guidance as to what would be most useful. If you're on your own to find useful things and need some ideas, here are some in no ...


0

Make sure your environment is ok: Noise: your kids playing in the same room is a killer, radio or meaningful songs also take up your head space Temperature: make sure it's not too hot in your room, or you brain will get hazy Air: ventilate often, and maybe buy a CO2 sensor to make sure your brain has enough oxygen Popups: make sure no Skype messages arrive ...


0

I'm practically in the same position - coder working from home since a long while - 2005. And what i found to alleviate mental stress has been to multi-task in between work and games, social networks, chatting, and even watching anime (japanese, futurama, anything) all at the same time. 15 minutes of coding - or until i am stuck and there is tension ...



Top 50 recent answers are included