Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

25

Based on the Wikipedia article you quoted: Flow is the mental state of operation in which a person in an activity is fully immersed in a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and success in the process of the activity. The pauses are supposed to keep you energized, so that you don't burn out from your work. These are useful to take a drink, ...


17

I don't think the Pomodoro Technique is for everyone. It works really great for people who are trying to deal with constant external distractions or who are prone to procrastination (internal distractions). If you have no trouble getting into a flow state and staying focused on your work, then you might not need to use Pomodoro at all.


15

As software developer I had similar problem. But I solved this for me by just skipping couple breaks and moving forward until break I'd like to take. For me interruption is small disadvantage of pomodoro technique, comparable to big advantage - getting into the flow with couple pomodoros.


15

The pitfall to learning with an IDE is that there's stuff it does for you under the hood that otherwise has to be done manually. For example, in C (don't know RoR at all, sorry), Eclipse will handle compilation/linking for you. Given a command line, you would be hopeless. What's GCC? What's a makefile? Using an IDE most of the time is fine, you just have to ...


11

I use the Pomodoro technique when coding and found that the 25 minutes was a bit short, so I doubled the times. I have a 50min working time and 10min break, I've found that gives me long enough to get in the flow, get some work done and then take a break. I know it's not the approved / text book approach... but my view is that it is only a technique and as ...


9

A smart worker is one who gets the job done within specific deadline most of the time. Most of the time his boss can rely on him to get the job done (try to build this impression to your boss). According to me here how one can be a smart worker: Always always do some sort of research upfront before starting a task. Researching is the best way to save time ...


9

Other answers are really good, I just want to point out one truly important thing: When you are too focused on a task you are following your path and you usually overlook other possibilities. When you break you have time to Rest your body from the (usually) sitting position Rest your eyes (truly important) Break from the work and flow you were in When ...


7

I used to have a guy who worked for me as a management analyst who was the king of "how can I come up with a better way to do the job". He would take 40 hours to come up with a way to do a job in an hour. Unfortunately the job would have only taken 10 hours to do using the intial method proposed and was a one-time task. He missed every dealine and other ...


7

This is a very broad question with no right answer. But to mention a few other aspects not mentioned in the other answer: You need to be able to work in teams and be familiar with the basics of software development methodologies, such as Scrum and agile development. This is especially so if you aspire to be a team leader. Learn design patterns to know how ...


7

I would avoid file type specific version control systems as having to look in too many places would not help your situation. For that reason I would recommend moving from SVN to Git for the repository for a few reasons. I know that would not be an easy task but keep reading for my reasoning. Git treats all file types the same (text, binary, etc.) Content ...


6

The main features of an IDE are: Code completion Building/executing Debugging I would say that it is very useful to learn how to build, execute and debug your software from the command line. IMO, that is the most useful skill you learn by not using an IDE. Once you know how to do that, try out Ruby IDEs and see if one of them suits you better than using ...


5

Regarding programming there are a lot of different formal methodologies for how you should go about it. But a lot of those assume you are already knowledgeable in the programming language and coding task at hand. There's also a lot of differing ideas on how to best learn things. But most of these are geared for pure learning, and don't really address the ...


5

Let's look at it from another perspective. From past experience, do you know which of the two methods you present works better for you? From my experience, I know that I learn programming best from ~doing~. I started learning Java last year. I had a 500+ page textbook that was completely daunting, and I just could not focus on the content. I wanted to ...


5

Reading between the lines, I'm guessing that you are being unproductive because of procrastination: you distract yourself with non-work to avoid finishing the projects. Perhaps the root cause, in your case, is your fear of failure or fear of success. If this is true, a good way to force yourself to finish the details quickly may be to "burn the bridges ...


4

If you are doing something that gets you into the flow pomodoro breaks can indeed stop the flow. To work around this I generally use pomodoros just when I'm doing something that is somewhat unpleasant or uninteresting or when I'm finding it difficult to concentrate ie. when attaining the flow is very rare anyway. Those times pomodoros help because you know ...


4

Both Emacs and Vim have excellent markdown modes, Emacs Markdown mode and Markdown Vim mode respectively. For processing I prefer Pandoc since it's cross-platform and has a lot of different output formats. If the 'task' requires more than one file I automate the generation process using Rake. You can also use a hack to make Org-mode use Markdown-style ...


4

A couple of ideas: Use a personal wiki (like Wikidpad if you're on Windows) to write your articles and organize them hierarchically. Add a dynamic tag to each one to indicate which edit step it's on, and then use the sorting features of the personal wiki to get the forest-level view of where you stand. (Wikidpad supports this.) Use a combination of a ...


4

Remember the Milk (rememberthemilk.com) is a multi-platform task management system, and it allows you to assign tasks to other people (I don't know too much about how well it works as I haven't used that functionality much myself). See: http://www.rememberthemilk.com/help/answers/sending/sendtask.rtm


4

Early optimization is the root of all evil. -Donald Knuth My approach is to just get things done, and then see if something could (and should) be improved. If you can program a computer, you know that 90% of the time is spent on 10% of the code. Optimizing anything other than the key 10% is usually a waste of time and effort.


4

"Measure 3 times, cut once." When I'm assigned to build an application, I don't go and open my development tools. I grab a pencil and paper and then I think about the application & the problem. I analyse it to it's core; I write down the list of problems I have to solve; I list requirements of the application. In this stage I determine exactly WHAT has ...


4

You might enjoy the book Pragmatic Thinking and Learning: Refactoring Your Wetware by Andy Hunt. The book covers a lot of subjects on improved learning and creativity. It's well-researched. I virtually guarantee that there's a trick or technique in there that you haven't heard of. I had heard of about 10%.


4

I've recently written about some rules for problem solving on my blog. My 8 year old son and I have figured them out to help him tackle his maths homework, but I've found that they work for other things, too. These rules are: Adopt the right physical posture Don't guess Look for patterns Take regular breaks Other rules I've yet to cover: Make space ...


3

I'll just leave a list for you here. All of these do task management, have a contacts list and allow assignment and communication of things between people, and having a free version of some type. I've used all of them at least briefly, and I came away with a positive experience. I currently use Doit.im on a daily basis for myself personally, but ...


3

I use voice memos for this almost exclusively. I almost always have my phone (or tablet) with me. Neither is conducive to typing, but both have either EverNote, with both voice and voice-to-text notes, or general voice recognition, if I have connectivity. I find this substantially faster than either writing by hand (which I enjoy) or typing on either ...


3

This is a great question. I attended a conference a while back where BJ Fogg presented (http://www.behaviormodel.org/) - my biggest takeaway, and one that changed my life - was to commit to doing something very small every day. Like write for 5 minutes - and assume that it will be something you throw away. By doing this - I get myself in the position to ...


3

If the things you have open in tabs are articles you want to read later, save them using Pocket. Its basically a bookmarking system which deletes the bookmarks after you read them (or rather archives them). It has tagging and a nice clutter-free article view. I use it to save interesting links I encounter, but do not have the time to read right now (e.g. if ...


3

I like to make extensive use of bookmarking to come back to things I need to read later. I add them all to a folder on my Bookmark bar -- either bookmarking as I go or Bookmarking All Tabs. Later I'll either come back to them individually or Open All Bookmarks with a right click and go through them when I have time. Then you can either remove them ...


3

My method for organizing my days is mostly based on lists and consistent behavior. I have a number of "to-do" lists (Personal, Work, Grocery, etc.) - as an example, below is my list for tomorrow. You will notice I don't try to plan for every minute of my day, that's because (as you mentioned) you get unexpected calls from colleagues needing something. If ...


3

Dropbox with the Packrat feature (has to be paid extra) turned on will keep an unlimited number of previous versions of any files you put in it. description taken from the Dropbox Homepage: Packrat is a feature that gives you unlimited deletion recovery and version history. By default, Dropbox saves a history of all deleted and earlier versions ...


2

I tried Pomodoro for maybe a month or so in the past, but went back. I think this might have one of the reasons. To mitigate this, you could think about the task during your break, which is what the later parts of the book suggests. The important thing it promotes is to take regular breaks. I would still suggest you give it a try for at least a week or so ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible