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20

Summary: learn how to form the letters correctly (unlearn bad habits) and practice, practice, practice. Personally, I addressed this same problem by: Purchasing a fountain pen that I really wanted, so that the act of writing was less of a chore and something that I actually began to enjoy. Doesn't have to be a fountain pen, the point is this new "toy" ...


14

Multitasking is hard. Let me change it. "Useful Multitasking is hard". It takes times. And one of the most important parts is your brain in this process. Human brain doesn’t multi-task like an expert magician; it switches frantically between tasks. In there, real problem occurs when we try to concentrate on the two tasks we are dealing with, because this ...


13

I faced this problem once. I just went to the local bookstore and bought myself a kindergarten book on cursive writing. Finish the book one page per day and notice the change! Repeat whenever you're slacking. :)


11

I am talking about a personal journal, not a blog. Something to be read by you only, not the whole world. Journal makes you more introspective. You learn to make your mind still, and investigate what exactly is going on in your mind. Journal is like a time-machine. It allows you to re-evaluate your mental response to anything you observed or happened to ...


10

You just shouldn't do this. Couple of points: Writing on tablets isn't great anyway - you would be much better served with a proper keyboard. If you are writing for lengthy periods of time, get yourself a proper seat and a desk adjusted to your measurements, a screen which is clear and height adjustable and even then you should take regular breaks to avoid ...


9

Type with ten fingers if you don't already do so, avoid hunting-and-pecking... Dvorak will decrease the finger distance, the switch can take from some weeks to some months. Keyboard training will help you practice to type common English words without making you wonder what to type. This allows you to practice at a higher wpm than when you would type things ...


9

There have been a lot of studies on handwriting and memory. The Wall Street Journal article How Handwriting Trains the Brain talks about one such study that shows that children learn to recognize letter shapes faster and more accurately if they write them out rather than typing them. Writing by hand also helps adults who are learning a graphically ...


8

You can't. Both of those things require your attention. Which means either one will tune one out or do a poor job at both. There are other things that you can listen to a webcast during though without losing focus - cleaning, reading comics, driving etc. (Granted you still lose some focus, but it's not as drastic.) Programming requires a lot of ...


8

This is just one factor, but you can't write well if the muscles in your hand are cramping. This article helped me realize why my hand hurt while writing. To keep your hand comfortable you need to use the muscles of your forearm and shoulder, and not your fingers. It's not a matter of fine motor skill, it's using the right muscles.


7

In my opinion, the secret to good handwriting is practice and a fountain pen. I have also found that writing in Cursive Style in a double line notebook helps in improving ones handwriting. But you have to patient as writing will not improve overnight. As mentioned earlier, it will take a lot of practice before changes are noticeable.


7

At 60 wpm it's easy to assume you have already memorized the keyboard and don't need to look at it. You're looking for a software that can be used to train your fingers to hit only the closest keys. Each color corresponds to a finger. The circles shows the standard position for left and right hands. It might look a bit complicated to get used to this but ...


7

I do have a diary, however I do not update it every day (due to an lack of proper structure in my evening routine). For me personally the benefit is not the possibility to read again entries from the past, but to be forced to think about what occurred during the day, what things you did were smart (or not so smart) and what the focus during the next day(s) ...


6

Don't. Just don't. Multi-tasking is not the answer. Better time management is. The only time you can multi-task effectively is reading while sitting on the toilet.


6

As with most things, deliberate practice. Fortunately you can do that by paying attention as you write and seeing where the problems are.


5

Whenever I typed with QWERTY, I used to type 40-65 WPM. 70 MAX. Now, I switched to DVORAK, I type anywhere between 70-120 WPM - depending on the complexity of what I'm typing. Someone said that the "social repercussions of typing in DVORAK far outweigh blah blah blah"...I just gotta call HogWash on that. Whenever you switch to DVORAK, your QWERTY ...


5

Pomodoro technique & breaking tasks down into to smaller subtasks helps me get through this type of work. Tasks that leave me brain-dead, I leave for the afternoon instead of morning, so I can go home when I am finished. I also block them all into half of one day per week. Spreading them out into something like one hour a day usually doesn't work for ...


4

While there certainly are things to do to improve your overall handwriting, this most likely takes a lot of time since you'll have to unlearn years of bad habits. Why not try to keep your handwriting down to a minimum, and type whenever possible, and then, when it's unavoidable, try to print as slowly as possible. Larger letters and bigger spacings help here ...


4

Without switching to a different keyboard layout, I've found it useful simply just to get in practice with visual feedback. This may or may not seem a bit corny, but the game-styled interface provided by Typeracer has been useful for me to check where my speed is, and to perform typing exercises through typing passages.


4

On most windows machines these days there's a key that produces the same effect as a right-click of the mouse. That's a hardware thing, so it should work in pretty much all programs. It is usually between the Alt and Ctrl keys to the right of the space bar, often has an icon that looks kind of like a dropdown menu. Non-QWERTY keyboards, YMMV. To do the ...


4

I always used to use paper and pencil, with a little pencil mounted torch so I wouldn't wake anyone. After a while you'll find you remember with less effort, and you might end up not even needing to write them down.


4

You can't do the same kinds of task together, but you can sometimes do 'multi'-tasking as long as it is an entirely different part of your brain... For example, you can do a task that takes mental concentration, while doing a physical task that you can do on auto-pilot. E.g. Listening to a complex podcast, while jogging. Watching a TED Talk while washing ...


4

I also keep a diary, in a big text file, partly to record the day's events, but also to keep track of progress toward my personal goals. Sometimes, the act of writing these concepts down makes me think about them clearly, causes them to move from the back of my mind to the front for a time. I used to have a structure, but mine are more free-form now. I do ...


4

Does maintaining Diary/Journal really pays back? Yes. It is a record of your life. Things you write down bring back memories, emotions, and feelings. It is a great way to reflect on your past. How should I maintain it so that when I refer back later it helps me? This is a personal preference. Do you just want something to write in? A diary or journal ...


4

Proofreading is a skill which can be trained - the way my mother (who is a proofreader for a couple of newspapers) and I learned was by: first practising on documents written by other people then practising on older documents written by yourself, perhaps by reading paragraphs out of order to stop you guessing what words or spelling should be there, rather ...


4

Feeling lonely is something most Phd students can relate to. Doing a Phd is lonely work. You alone are responsible for your thesis and many supervisors seem to care more about their own work than about you graduating. I think there are two options here: You are depressed or burnt out. Best is to go and seek professional help. You are not depressed or burnt ...


3

I won't write long texts with my tablet (I have the Asus Transformer with the dock). But why not trying out a speech-to-text application? This might turn out very well.


3

I believe diary writing is to watch your thoughts. There are sure to be some which you cannot share with anyone but they build your perception on things. That nowhere mean its all about writing what you cannot share but all about composing thoughts and perceptions.For this reason in particular date and no. of pages does not matter as everything is ...


3

I'd go with pomodoro technique as suggested by Dina. Yours seems more a problem of time and feeling management than one related to the difficulty of task. I tailored this approach for you. I think it's going to work! First step: Start a kitchen timer (25 minutes) and make suer you hear its ticking On a sheet of paper create a LIST with all the mails you ...


3

Something that helped me a little while ago was to realise that there was no real relation between the dread of the task, and the effort required to do the task... For example there have been tasks on my todo list that look like "email X about Y" that have sat there for nearly a week with me dreading them everyday. But it turns out that tasks like these ...


3

I use two methods - the basic, short term one is to mind map (I use Freemind, which is a free tool that works pretty well, but there are many like it) and add all aspects of the subject into the map, then I define linkages between them, which helps generate the flow, whether it be as an article for a newspaper or magazine, a presentation or a blog post. An ...



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