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Proofreading is a skill which can be trained - the way my mother (who is a proofreader for a couple of newspapers) and I learned was by: first practising on documents written by other people then practising on older documents written by yourself, perhaps by reading paragraphs out of order to stop you guessing what words or spelling should be there, rather ...


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In my highly biased opinion, the ultimate lifehack for this kind of problem is a commitment device. Here's a list of apps that employ commitment devices: http://blog.beeminder.com/competitors (As you can guess, my own company, Beeminder, is in that list.)


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If you're an advanced user (and don't mind writing/eding a script), try AutoHotKey. Very flexible, free, portable. What you need is covered through the Hotstrings feature. It does much more than text expansion. For example, you can configure it to type the date by typing a shorthand you choose (e.g. "Date: .d ", as soon as you type the last space, ".d" is ...


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One additional thing missing in the answers so far: distinguish what you're proofreading for. Usually there's two aspects of language to distinguish here: spelling and content. Do not try to check these together. I prefer to check all content aspects first: is the order of my texts logical, are my arguments good enough, am I using the right adverbs, does ...


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I need to put the writing aside (I say to myself "let it cool off") over night before I can spot many of my errors. When it is more immediate I have found that reading it out loud is the best thing (for me). The key to this is that it makes you SLOW DOWN and read EVERY WORD. The text-to-speech others mention sounds great. I'm eager to try it. Having ...


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The most effective proofreading technique I've come across is to read the text backwards. This assumes that by "proofreading" we mean reading for spelling and grammar mistakes, not content clarity. Other techniques (re-read after delay, read aloud, text to speech) are useful, and every time I use them, reading backwards finds more things to fix.


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One benefit of not waiting until the last minute, is to take a break from the paper. Start reading it the next morning, and you're likely to catch many errors. Otherwise, it's too easy to continue to glance over the familiar text and miss the errors. Make sure you're using a good word processor with spell and grammar check. If you send a teacher the ...


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I am a academic teacher so I write a lot of papers. The easiest way to check the text for errors is to read the test aloud (from a printed version) and mark mistakes. Secondly, I ask my wife to read the article. She helps me not only to find spelling mistakes but also she gives me a valuable feedback on the text structure and clarity.


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Here are a few things you could try: Do something small every day: Instead of trying to set out and write an entire paper now, set a goal that you're 90% confident you can reach every day and track it. It might be something that seems really low like 10 words per day, but that's more than 0 words and will build a habit (and you will grow this goal over ...


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Typing.io is really nice. It's designed specifically for programmers The paid version lets you upload and type any code you want. I haven't tried the paid version yet, but I think I might. Seems like a great way to get familiar with an open source project. If you're going to put time into reading and typing some text, wouldn't it be cool if that text ...


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While I appreciate your goal (most gain for best efficient use of time), I have found that the best tool is a combination of several tools, directed by a consciousness (metacognition) of how you're learning. You come to realize there are several aspects of typing: consistent speed, bursty typing, initial typing (vs being in the middle of a long paragraph), ...



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