128 reputation
10
bio website
location Germany
age
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Oct 20 at 11:57

Oct
20
comment How to “do it now”?
@THelper I have completely overhauled the question. It is now quite dissimilar to the other questions and explains why the answers given there don't apply.
Sep
12
comment Five days to memorize hundreds of terms and diagrams. How?
Actually, writing down what I have to learn helps me, too. The last exam, I did exactly what you would do. But I had one week more plus all the afternoons, and still only managed a mid range result. At the moment I'm afraid of not passing at all. Problem is, it's so much.
Sep
12
comment Five days to memorize hundreds of terms and diagrams. How?
Written. There are questions like: "What are the three components of job satisfaction?" I then have to write down those three (affective, attitudinal, behavioral components). Or: "Draw a sample diagram for a matrix organisation." These are questions from a previous exam. I don't know the questions for mine.
Mar
21
comment How to make myself do homework?
I have the same problem (don
Mar
21
comment How to make myself do homework?
The problem with GTD is that it applies only to situations where you have to deal with a multitude of tasks. It helps you to get the important things done first. I don't see how GTD can help with overcoming procrastination when you have only one thing to do, nothing else needs to be done, but you simply don't want to do it, because you hate it -- like doing your homework.
Mar
15
comment Finding possible meeting dates between parties via intersecting calendar files
People working in organizations often work with organization-provided computers that are administered by an organization technician -- which in effect means that there is not private data on them anyway. So within an organization a locally installed tool accessible through the intranet would be highly practicable. I'd therefor be grateful if you would share any info you have on such tools.
Mar
14
comment How to think effectively?
Who says that we have to find the "simple method" (or simple solution)?
Mar
14
comment Working on too many ideas?
Re: limit the number of ongoing procects: I'm not sure if this was in GtD, but to illustrate how to set priorities the author told of the female military officer who made a to-do list and then crossed out everything except the two most important things, thus making sure that these two things would get done, instead of getting confused and lost about what to do. If you want to effectively switch tasks, you want to know what task to switch to and not waste time and energy with a mulitude of equally attractive or urgent options. Make sure your alternatives are clear and switching is automatic.
Oct
28
comment Resetting ones' whole biological clock?
I feel that you won't be able to solve this problem, unless you can command the willpower to get up at the time you want to get up and not sleep at noon. From my own experience, I'd guess that basically you don't see the purpose of getting up early, because obviously you manage your life and don't have any negative effects (like losing your job). Maybe you have this fantasy that it would be better, but sleep still appears much more important to you. So solve the motivation problem. When I have purpose, I just step out of the bed as soon as the alarm rings. When I don't, I fall back asleep.
Sep
23
comment Strategies for studying multiple subjects at the same time
If you don't feel that you need a break, maybe you actually don't need one and the change in itself is reviving enough. It would be an easy test to take breaks for a week and compare your learning process and fatigue to the previous week without. Basically I would say: if you feel good, and you do not procrastinate instead of being focused on your learning, then there is nothing wrong with your method. But if you feel that you loose the motivation to learn too early or you cannot concentrate, then maybe breaks will help. But again, the rhythm for breaks is individual and not an exact science.
Sep
23
comment Strategies for studying multiple subjects at the same time
If you want research papers, someone else will have to come up with the answer. If you want a practical tip, I'd reward myself with the fun subject and relax with it from the boring subject: study what you dislike for 45 to 50 min, take a break of 5 to 15 minutes, then study what you enjoy for 20 to 30 minutes. Take a short (5 min) break, then begin with boring subject again etc. If you have more than two subjects, do one boring/fun pair in the morning, one in the afternoon (or whenever your most productive phases are; pick the most productive phase for the most difficult or largest subject).
Sep
23
comment Strategies for studying multiple subjects at the same time
Yes, but the switching cost (and switching benefit) for task switching is different for different people. If you carry out an experiment with random subjects, the results will not tell you, what would be best for you. It is like "What height is the best for a chair?" It depends on a person's height. Finding the average won't make a chair comfy for you. Psychology cannot predict outcomes in individual cases, it is a probabilistic science and finds its use for the chair manufacturer who wants to know what size of chair will be least uncomfortable for the most people.
Sep
23
comment Strategies for studying multiple subjects at the same time
Since people are different, I'm not sure research would help you. I know people who prefer to kill one subject at a time, and I know people who relax from one subject by studying another. Both kinds of people appear successful to me, and I wouldn't know if one could benefit from a switch to the other method. If you want to go about this scientifically AND learn what would be best for YOU, then you need to undertake an experiment with yourself as the subject. For this test phase, use one method, for the next, use another. Do this a couple of times and take account of the confounding factors.